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Dec. 10 plantings: Brentwood-Darlington et al STILL ON; Kelly Butte CANCELLED

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Dec 09, 2016.

Hello tree-planters! The Saturday, Dec. 10 planting in the Brentwood-Darlington, Woodstock, Sellwood-Moreland, Eastmoreland neighborhoods (SE Portland)  is CONTINUING AS PLANNED. Details here. However, the Kelly Butte planting is CANCELLED. For those of you who brave the elements to join us this weekend, THANK YOU!

Just How Essential Is the EPA Anyway?

By Devon Downeysmith from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Dec 09, 2016.

President-elect Donald Trump has selected Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to run the Environmental Protection Agency. If you’re even peripherally familiar with Pruitt’s environmental record, you know that this appointment is terrifying. For those who don’t know about Pruitt, here’s the lowdown: he’s the poster boy for valuing polluters’ profits over people. Pruitt does not […]

Adopt your neighborhood

By Jen Coleman from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Dec 09, 2016.

Think global, act local: it’s more than a bumper sticker. Some attribute the concept to an urban planner at the turn of the 20th century. The concept is this: When you act on your values close to home, it has ripple effects far beyond your street corner. Consider these three examples: Adopt a storm drain:  […]

Some of IAE’s Accomplishments During 2016

By Jeanette Hardison from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 08, 2016.

Restoring Native Species and Habitats Started a seed production farm for Willamette Valley and coastal prairie species, helping fill an ongoing need for high-quality native plant materials for restoration. Launched the Southwest Seed Partnership to improve the supply and diversity of native seed for large scale restoration in New Mexico and Arizona. Planted over 130,000 […]

Infographic: 11 Elements of Water Quality Trading

By Danielle from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Dec 08, 2016.

  These elements can guide and assist agencies and stakeholders in making key

The post Infographic: 11 Elements of Water Quality Trading appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Bend Sports Shop Goes Electric

By Devon Downeysmith from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

We love ourselves a good clean energy story – especially local ones that show how making the switch can save money and make lives better! Here’s a great example from Pine Mountain Sports in Bend, Oregon. They recently purchased an electric car as their new shop vehicle, making skiing trips to Mt. Bachelor more affordable, and taking their commitment […]

Wetland Gift Guide

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

It feels good to give loved ones awesome presents, especially gifts that benefit Oregon’s wetlands. Shop from the list below and your purchase will benefit not just your gifts recipient, but the work of The Wetlands Conservancy. Pack your sleeping bag, an adventurous spirit and join us for a weekend at Camp Westwind.  Located on

Beaver T-Shirt

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

Doing More With Less: A Changemaker Interview with Philena Seldon

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

In February, we will launch our newest discussion course book – A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World. Today we share one of the interviews that NWEI Curriculum Director Lacy Cagle conducted for this new course, highlighting many of… Read More!

The post Doing More With Less: A Changemaker Interview with Philena Seldon appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Tell State Lawmakers: Cancel the Elliot State Forest Sale

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

By Mike Allen In one week the State Land Board will vote on whether to sell the oldest state forest in Oregon. The Elliott State Forest near Coos bay is home to several threatened or endangered species including Coho salmon, Pacific lamprey, spotted owl, and the vanishing marbeled murrelet. The murrelet nests high in large […]

Its Winter in the Northwest….Best Time to Eat Lots of Delicious Local Seafood!

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

Planning a holiday gathering or meal out with a friend? Consider going to TWC’s longtime supporters; Nostrana, St Jack, La Moule or XICO. These restaurants each have a deep commitment to sustainable seafood and understanding of the importance of conserving and restoring healthy estuaries. Cathy Whims of Nostrana states it best “At Nostrana, our menu

Calling all designers! Now accepting submissions to The Street Trust t-shirt design contest

By Lauren Hugel from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

If you haven’t heard, we’ve grown to the Power of 3! We now advocate for healthy and thriving communities where it is safe and easy for […]

Video – Freshwater Fueling Your Every Adventure

By Brian Kelley from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

  What do paddling a kayak, fly fishing, and deep powder turns all

The post Video – Freshwater Fueling Your Every Adventure appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

For Every Kid Campaign Update: Send a Safe Routes to School Postcard!

By Sarah Newsum from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Dec 04, 2016.

The For Every Kid Coalition is focusing on the 2017 legislative session and the fight for dedicated funding for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) education programs and street […]

*Insert Fun-Guy Joke Here*

By Jason from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

A collection of Mushrooms We found on our hike.
Bruce Newhouse holds up a Boletus species for the group.

On November 13th, the Eugene office of Oregon Wild hosted our annual mushroom hike, with our special guest leader Bruce Newhouse. Bruce leads our Mushroom Hike every year, and our hikers adore him, he has an impressive way of answering the incredible amount of questions that come up when you take 15 people out looking for mushrooms. This year, we wanted to share some stories with you about how the mushroom hike went, so we asked a couple of our hikers to share their thoughts. I hope you enjoy reading them below! 

Ella joins Oregon Wild on hikes frequently, for the mushroom hike she brought along her mom Shawn!

 Ella Hardy-Spittle:

Oregon Wild makes hiking accessible to everyone and educates hikers in the process (whether it be about current timber sales they are working to halt, geographic history, or in this case mushroom ecology). I had no idea that such a vast plethora of mushrooms existed so close to home; the ability to identify them and discuss each mushroom's unique properties with a specialist (Bruce) was truly a treat. Some of my favorite finds were cat's tongue (Pseudohydnum gelatinosum), an odd coral, black trumpet/black chanterelle (Craterellus cornucopioides), and lots of tiny mushrooms that I couldn't even get identifications for. Along with education about individual mushrooms,  Bruce also taught us about mycorrhizal relationships (the interactions between fungus and plant roots). I wish I had brought paper and a pencil to take notes! I am definitely looking forward to next year's mushroom hike. 

These hard to find Black Chanterelles were one of the most exciting finds of the day, and one of Ella's favorites! 
Sara & Markus, long time Oregon Wild supporters, have been on many Oregon Wild adventures! 

Sara & Markus Walker:
For me, the best thing on the hike was seeing how excited Markus was to be there, learning on a Sunday, how many questions he had, how excited he was to explore the forest with Bruce.

We have enjoyed all of the Oregon Wild adventures we have been on over the last 5+ years.  Mushroom hikes in particular are fun because there is a lot to see and learn, and the hikes are shorter and better suited to a young hiker with a shorter attention span.

It's difficult to put into words how much Oregon Wild, and specifically Wendell's hikes,  have meant to us personally.

When I read the news  of Wendell Wood passing, I literally sat down in the corner of an empty house where I was working and sobbed at the loss of such a great man.  He was the leader of so many of our best days.  He knew I usually could not come on a hike without Markus, he always welcomed him. He was endlessly kind and patient answering our questions about flowers or mushrooms over and over and over again. 

Wendell Wood spent 30 years helping Oregon Wild inspire people like Sara & Markus to keep Oregon Wild! 

 

The kindness and friendship and leadership from Wendell and all of the other leaders and members of Oregon Wild has been such an incredible blessing in our lives. I don't remember exactly how I found Oregon Wild, an event calendar posted somewhere must have caught my eye. When I started going on hikes, I was completely broke. I probably paid nothing or maybe only 5$ per trip for the entire first year or two. Everyone at Oregon Wild was so compassionate, so friendly, and so encouraging. I started to feel at home and at peace for the first time in as long as I could remember and I know Markus felt the same.

Thank you for everything!

 

 

This Birds Nest Fungus with "Eggs" in it, was one of their favorite finds of the day! 

Interested in joining Oregon Wild on future hikes? Make sure you are signed up for our email alerts, and keep an eye out for our messages! Oregon Wild leads hikes year round, in different conditions and environments around Oregon, whatever your interests or skill level, we’d love to have you join us in appreciating the places that Keep Oregon Wild! 

Rally for the Elliott State Forest

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

This is it! The Oregon Department of State Lands has received a bid that would see the Elliott State Forest sold to a private timber company and heavily logged. Our elected leaders, including Governor Kate Brown, Treasurer Ted Wheeler, and Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins have the opportunity to stop the privatization process and Save […]

EPA: Federal Review of Longview Coal Export Terminal “Inadequate”

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

"EPA found the Army Corps' review was 'Inadequate' — the lowest ranking possible. The Army Corps flat out ignored recommendations from Tribes, cities, environmental groups, and the EPA to fix their incomplete scope of impacts associated with what would be the largest coal export terminal in North America. Air quality, noise impacts, greenhouse gas emissions, rail congestion and safety are just a few of the areas where EPA calls out the Army Corps’ failures. This should serve as a wake up call to the Corps." -Brett VandenHeuvel, Executive Director

Europe Maintains Commitment to Ambition and Action at Recent Marrakesh Climate Talks

By Christopher Webb from Conservancy Talk. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

2016 is now set to be the warmest year on record[1]. In Europe, this observed climate change has already led to a wide range of impacts on the environment, economy and human health[2]. Counted together, European countries make up the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world[3], and recognizing the risks of inaction, […]

Plants for People – bringing traditional ecological knowledge to restoration

By Peter Moore from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

Herbert Farm and Natural Area, a City of Corvallis property which lies at the confluence of Marys River and Muddy Creek south of Corvallis, was historically an important food gathering area for the Kalapuya people. Much of those tribal connections to the area have been lost and natural habitats degraded through conversion to agriculture. The […]

Federal Agencies Seek Gorge Community Input on Wild Salmon Restoration Plan

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

“Salmon are a part of the Pacific Northwest way of life, but they are on the brink of extinction. In 2015 hot water killed 99% of the Snake River sockeye run and temperatures will continue to rise in the face of climate change. One of the most effective steps to protecting wild salmon from the impacts of a warming climate is restoring a free-flowing Snake River,” said Lorri Epstein, Water Quality Director of Columbia Riverkeeper.

Beers Made By Walking returns to Eugene

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

Drink up the land when Beers Made By Walking returns this winter. The Continue reading

2017 Programs Open for Registration!

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

We are thrilled to present a new and exciting slate of workshops and expeditions for 2017! […]

MetLife’s Story of Change: How a Custom EcoChallenge Inspired 1,200 Employees

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

As we reach the end of the year we’re celebrating the successes of 2016, and one big celebration is the launch of custom EcoChallenges. Today we’re excited to share how MetLife used a custom EcoChallenge to inspire over 1,200 employees… Read More!

The post MetLife’s Story of Change: How a Custom EcoChallenge Inspired 1,200 Employees appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Don’t all kids deserve a safe route to school?

By Lauren Hugel from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

Do you believe every kid in Oregon deserves a safe route to school? Now is a crucial time to show your support. The Oregon Legislature is back in […]

Coyote Creek Meadows Protected

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

With your generous support, 38 acres of wetlands and camas-filled meadows are now permanently protected for conservation. Continue reading

WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO FREE THE SNAKE RIVER

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

The Northwest used to be home to the greatest salmon runs in the world: The Columbia-Snake River System. Snake River salmon migrate farther and higher than any salmon on the planet, through eight dams and inland to their high-elevation mountain homes in eastern Oregon, Washington and Idaho. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild … Continue reading WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO FREE THE SNAKE RIVER

Arran Robertson: I Support...

By arran from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Street Roots & Willamette Week Fund for Investigative Journalism

The hard working staff at Oregon Wild are dedicated to defending Oregon’s wild lands, wildlife, and waters. But there is more to us than our efforts to protect old growth forests, recover gray wolves, or reform Oregon’s lax clearcutting laws. We are also part of our broader communities. At a time when reaching out to our neighbors and working together across causes is more important than ever, we wanted to take the opportunity to spotlight some of the work done by other organizations. Our staff has selected causes that are important to them, and explained why they think these efforts are worthy of your support.

A free press is absolutely essential to a functioning republic. Unfortunately, our precious fourth estate has struggled to find its way in the new digital world. This is not some new problem, but one that has been building for some time now, and one that has concerned me as a communications professional. I have despaired to see stories that I know to be vitally important go unreported. This is not because Oregon is without dedicated and principled journalists, but it just doesn’t have enough (though I could certainly name some outlets that could use more journalists AND principles). There are too many stories to tell for the current newsroom budgets, and too many incentives to chain journalists to their desks pumping out listicles and trending internet stories that get clicks but have no greater value of serving an informed citizenry.

Unfortunately, 2016 has escalated this problem to what is, in my view, a threat to the very foundations of our society. Increasingly, shrill cries of “media bias” have been successfully used to counter basic, reality-based reporting. In this new post-truth world, feelings matter more than facts, and reporting on the latter will earn hard working journalists death threats. 

Add to that the proliferation of “fake news” reaching new heights this year. Buzzfeed published a study recently that showed that more people saw and shared “fake news” articles on social networks in the lead up to the election than real ones. One author bragged that he made $10,000 a month writing outlandish and absolutely untrue stories to be shared online, a salary over twice what an average real reporter makes. 

This also comes at a time when the Obama Administration, which has an earned reputation of being particularly cagey with the press, is about to be replaced by a president-elect that is not only openly hostile to the press, but has gleefully entertained revoking basic First Amendment protections.

We need good reporting, now more than ever. The most direct way to support good reporting is to get a subscription to your local newspaper, or support outlets like OPB through regular donations. But the giving spirit of the holiday and the Give Guide offer some additions and alternatives. 

I am supporting two local sources for quality journalism. The first is Street Roots, which is an excellent source of thoughtful, on-the-ground reporting on issues often overlooked by other outlets. It also offers opportunities for people experiencing homelessness and poverty. The second is the Willamette Week Fund for Investigative Journalism, providing resources for Willamette Week's well respected (and feared) newsroom. 

The Internet and digital communications will continue to offer new opportunities and challenges. Sorting reality from the rubbish, and placing a greater value on facts-based journalism, is one of the priorities I hope we take up in the coming year. 

Here’s to a less post-truth 2017!

Shasta Zielke: I Support...

By shasta from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Basic Rights Education FundPlanned Parenthood

The hard working staff at Oregon Wild are dedicated to defending Oregon’s wild lands, wildlife, and waters. But there is more to us than our efforts to protect old growth forests, recover gray wolves, or reform Oregon’s lax clearcutting laws. We are also part of our broader communities. At a time when reaching out to our neighbors and working together across causes is more important than ever, we wanted to take the opportunity to spotlight some of the work done by other organizations. Our staff has selected causes that are important to them, and explained why they think these efforts are worthy of your support.

As we approach the end of 2016, and process and recover from the presidential campaign and election, I find my thoughts turning constantly to what I know to be my core values and reassessing how I’m standing up for those values on a daily basis. I’ve taken a step back to decide how I can mindfully use my resources to do the most good, with the knowledge that it’s now more important than ever that I focus on helping others as much as I possibly can. One of the easiest and most effective ways to leverage my resources is to donate to causes that are close to my heart – and also ones which may be under attack in the next four years.

That being said, I’m excited to support two local organizations through this year’s Willamette Week Give!Guide – Basic Rights Education Fund and Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette.

Basic Rights Education Fund is the educational branch of Basic Rights Oregon. The fund works to train people in transgender justice and LGBTQ equality across the state, so that all LGBTQ Oregonians are able to live in safe and positive communities and have access to equal opportunities. Basic Rights Oregon has been a major player in state politics over the last few decades and has helped the LGBTQ community make huge strides toward true equality. There’s more work to be done to make sure that Oregon is truly doing all that we can to  support all of our citizens, and supporting the Basic Rights Education Fund is one way that I’m showing up to help advance change.

Planned Parenthood of Columbia Willamette has been providing access to reproductive health care for Oregonians since 1963. They make a difference in the lives of tens of thousands of patients each year – from educating young people to providing cancer screenings to low-income populations. As we face the very real likelihood that the Affordable Care Act will be repealed in the next four years, meaning that thousands of Oregonians will lose their health insurance, Planned Parenthood will become more important than ever. Access to health care should always be a right for all and never a privilege afforded to a select group. Planned Parenthood has stood firm for over 50 years to make sure that all people can access quality health care, regardless of income or insurance status – and I’m standing firm in my commitment to their mission by becoming a donor this year.

If, like me, you’ve been searching for a way to make the world a little bit better, I hope that you’ll explore this year’s Give!Guide and make a commitment to one of the 141 worthy non-profits. As a representative of Oregon Wild (also featured in the Give!Guide), I thank you in advance for your dedication to doing good and giving through the Give!Guide. Happy holidays! 

Gaby Diaz: I Support...

By Gaby from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Outside In

The hard working staff at Oregon Wild are dedicated to defending Oregon’s wild lands, wildlife, and waters. But there is more to us than our efforts to protect old growth forests, recover gray wolves, or reform Oregon’s lax clearcutting laws. We are also part of our broader communities. At a time when reaching out to our neighbors and working together across causes is more important than ever, we wanted to take the opportunity to spotlight some of the work done by other organizations. Our staff has selected causes that are important to them, and explained why they think these efforts are worthy of your support.

Back in 1968 the United States was going through a revolution. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy were assassinated, Star Trek aired American television’s first interracial kiss, and two black Olympic athletes raised a fist in protest of racial discrimination. Here in Portland a handful of doctors responded by opening a free community health clinic to care for transient youth who found themselves far from home and in need of help. When there was nowhere else to turn, Outside In opened its doors.

As the years passed Portland’s homeless population increased and the need for more comprehensive and holistic care grew.  Outside In believed (and still does) that medical care should not be a privilege but a right despite a person’s socioeconomic status, race, sexual and gender identity, ability, citizenship status, or drug use.  What started as a medical clinic morphed into a network of support systems. As of today, Outside In is comprised of a mobile medical RV, a school based health center in Clackamas County, a needle exchange program, an employment resource center,  a tattoo removal program, housing units, and Portland’s only nonprofit doggie daycare center, Virginia Woof.

Outside In has been a Portland staple for decades now, and has done incredible work to help homeless youth and other marginalized people move towards improved health and self-sufficiency. At a time where millions of people are under threat of losing their health insurance (and much more), this nonprofit needs our help more than ever in supporting their mission. After all, health care should be a right and not a privilege, and I believe that’s something we can all get behind. 

Please consider donating to Outside In through Willamette Week’s Give!Guide and support health and wellness here in Portland. 

Jason Gonzales: I Support...

By Jason from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Ophelia's Place

The hard working staff at Oregon Wild are dedicated to defending Oregon’s wild lands, wildlife, and waters. But there is more to us than our efforts to protect old growth forests, recover gray wolves, or reform Oregon’s lax clearcutting laws. We are also part of our broader communities. At a time when reaching out to our neighbors and working together across causes is more important than ever, we wanted to take the opportunity to spotlight some of the work done by other organizations. Our staff has selected causes that are important to them, and explained why they think these efforts are worthy of your support.

Ophelia’s Place describes itself as “a community for girls.” What does that mean? It means they are pros at providing a safe, empowering place where any kid who identifies as "her" can be herself, and find respect! Providing services for girl identified youth between ages 10-18, staff and volunteers offer services that foster their mission of maintaining health through personal development and empowerment.With workshops that vary from comedy, baking, and hula hooping to health and wellness resources and much more, any young girl can find a way to be involved with something she loves.

Ophelia’s Place also provides an after school drop in space, and a girl-directed leadership group called The Women’s Advisory Council for Youth. Many services are free of cost and other services are based on a sliding scale. Your donation will ensure that Ophelia’s Place reaches the girls of our community regardless of income, helping build friendships and talents that will aid them on their journey to becoming successful young women. Donations may be made by phone at (541) 284-4333, mailed to 1577 Pearl Street, Suite 100, Eugene OR 97401, or made online at www.opheliasplace.net

 

 

Chandra LeGue: I Support...

By chandra from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Bitch Media & Willamette Riverkeeper

The hard working staff at Oregon Wild are dedicated to defending Oregon’s wild lands, wildlife, and waters. But there is more to us than our efforts to protect old growth forests, recover gray wolves, or reform Oregon’s lax clearcutting laws. We are also part of our broader communities. At a time when reaching out to our neighbors and working together across causes is more important than ever, we wanted to take the opportunity to spotlight some of the work done by other organizations. Our staff has selected causes that are important to them, and explained why they think these efforts are worthy of your support.

Bitch Media isn’t the friendliest of names, I know. But if you’re trying to call attention to your cause, a provocative name can help! Bitch’s mission is definitely worthy of attention. The nonprofit media group seeks to provide and encourage “an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”

I’m a feminist. You probably are too. But I don’t think deeply about feminism every day – I work to protect forests! Fortunately for women and advocates everywhere, the folks at Bitch Media do think about this stuff every day. They get diverse bloggers, writers, artists, and activists to weigh in and critique media coverage and pop culture through their magazine, website, and podcasts.

One of these guest writers is my friend Everett Maroon. As a long time feminist activist and a trans man raising a couple of boys, I admire and respect Everett’s point of view, which challenges me in the best way possible. Here is his perspective on the importance of Bitch Media, and I hope you’ll agree!

Bitch Magazine just celebrated its 20th anniversary. That's twenty years of holding up popular culture to a feminist lens, looking at everything from Barbie dolls to depictions of femininity in magazines, to women in television -- in front of and behind the camera -- and of course, in understanding American politics as a pervasive facet of popular culture. Yes, nowadays we have The Rumpus, and Jezebel, and other feminist web sites, but Bitch did it first, and as a nonprofit, the Bitch team continues to occupy a strong intellectual yet accessible space for feminists of many generations to consider more effectively how popular culture reflects and produces the opportunities for women. Given what is ahead for women in the near term, Bitch is extremely deserving of support as people try to make sense of and anticipate our new reality.

Willamette Riverkeeper

At Oregon Wild, we mostly deal with rivers running through public land – Wild & Scenic Rivers, pristine headwaters of major watersheds, and popular riverside trails. The headwaters of the Willamette River fall into those categories – the McKenzie, the North Fork Middle Fork, Opal Creek, the Middle Santiam… By the time these streams and rivers reach the mainstem, the Willamette’s more or less outside of our “jurisdiction” if you will. But it is the mainstem Willamette that really connects communities up and down the mighty Valley. 

Many of us in western Oregon likely take the Willamette River for granted, but nearly 70% of the state’s population lives within a 20 minute drive of the river. Where I am in Eugene, at the confluence of 3 of the Willamette’s big tributaries, I jog along the river path, swim at a beach I can ride my bike to, and watch osprey dive for fish while I’m enjoying a beer. The same water flows by those of you in Portland, who might be doing the same things along its banks.  The Willamette connects us all the way up the valley – through pioneer towns, farm fields, woodlands, and industrial wastelands.

Groups like Willamette Riverkeeper help foster a connection to this mighty river that connects us all. While they do great work to reduce pollution, protect land along the greenway, and restore wildlife habitat, their work goes far beyond your classic environmental group:  They help connect people to the river, and communities of people to each other.  Bringing people of all ages, from diverse communities, to the river to pick up garbage, plant trees, or dip a paddle is a great way to bring us all together!

Social Equity and the Environment

By admin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

Many of Oregon’s low-income neighborhoods and communities of color face greater environmental hazards, have less access to environmental benefits, and have the fewest resources to address these challenges. Because these communities endure many inequities, they are uniquely vulnerable to health harm from environmental factors. Oregon’s decision-makers and others who benefit from power and privilege—including Oregon […]

wishing you trees on earth & goodwill towards all

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

  There is always some good we can do. As part of the Friends of Trees community you have already done so much good for our neighborhoods and natural areas, for the planet and the people and creatures on it. Together, we will do even more. Friends of Trees creates inclusive spaces for all community […]

In Memoriam: Justin Buri

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

2016110400
Andrew Riley
Tue, 11/29/2016 - 1:03am

1000 Friends of Oregon mourns the loss of Justin Buri, who passed away on November 1st, 2016. Justin was well-known in our community as a champion of housing justice: he served as a board member of Housing Land Advocates, a core member of the statewide Inclusionary Zoning Coalition, and as former Executive Director of the Community Alliance of Tenants.

read more

Connecting Oregon Farmers to Wholesale Markets

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

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Greg Holmes
Tue, 11/29/2016 - 12:00pm

Earlier this month the Oregon Community Food System Network (OCFSN) brought farmers, distributors, and institutional buyers from around Oregon and the Pacific Northwest together in Medford to share ideas on how to help Oregon’s farmers get more Oregon-grown food onto the plates of Oregonians.

Agriculture and Oregon’s Land Use Program

read more

Departments of Justice and Housing and Urban Development Release Updated Fair Housing Act Guidance on State and Local Land Use Laws

By andrew from The Latest. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

2016110300
Mary Kyle McCurdy
Tue, 11/29/2016 - 12:12pm

The US Justice Department and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently released updated guidance on how to apply the federal Fair Housing Act (FHA) to state and local land use and zoning laws.  The FHA prohibits discrimination in housing based on disability, race, color, religion, national ori

read more

News: Diesel in Oregon

By Jen Coleman from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

Every day we learn more about diesel exhaust and its health hazards for Oregon residents. Read about Oregon’s diesel challenges in recent news coverage: Oregon gets $85 million in VW emissions settlement Most Oregonians at Risk of Cancer Due to Diesel, Study Says Oregon Environmental Council: Diesel exhaust kills 460 Oregonians, costs the state $3.5B, every year […]

Impact: Made Possible by You

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

Ambition is an inherent part of The Freshwater Trust. Beyond the on-the-ground work

The post Impact: Made Possible by You appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Coal news – featured

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

"EPA found the Army Corps' review was 'Inadequate' — the lowest ranking possible. The Army Corps flat out ignored recommendations from Tribes, cities, environmental groups, and the EPA to fix their incomplete scope of impacts associated with what would be the largest coal export terminal in North America." -Brett VandenHeuvel, Executive Director

High Fives for Giving Tuesday!

By admin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

We all have plenty of ‘stuff’ in our lives, but an OEC membership gives more than that. Your donation today helps protect Oregon’s environment for generations to come. And it can be done in the name of someone you love. As an alternative to Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and the many other shopping-centric holidays that abound, nonprofits have worked […]

Infographic: Salmon Spotted. Fish Returning to Restored Sites in Oregon

By Danielle from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

Fish are returning to many of our restored project sites throughout Oregon, including

The post Infographic: Salmon Spotted. Fish Returning to Restored Sites in Oregon appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Rally for wild salmon!

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help. Please RSVP to attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, […]

Year in Review: 2016 Highlights

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

  The past 365 days were characterized by important on-the-ground work for watersheds in need,

The post Year in Review: 2016 Highlights appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

New report: Tribal Native Plant Materials Program Development Plan for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

By Peter Moore from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

IAE recently completed the Tribal Native Plant Materials Program Development Plan for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The plan is part of "Plants for People: bringing traditional ecological knowledge to restoration", a project funded by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. In addition to conducting restoration with a cultural plant focus, and gaining insights from […]

A Safe Place for All to Visit

By katie from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

Two weeks ago the staff of Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center gathered in Jawbone Flats to […]

Two Year State Parks Calendar Available

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

Oregon State Parks calendars are here! We have a gorgeous 8.5″ x 11″ calendar with stunning images from Oregon State Parks.  Unlike a classic calendar, this is a TWO YEAR calendar (2017 & 2018). Make a donation to the Foundation of $20 or more before December 31, 2016, and we will send you this fabulous calendar as […]

Green Friday Prize Winners

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 27, 2016.

OPT Outside – Green Friday – Prizes Winners shown in RED – we will be in contact with you shortly to get you your prize! Congratulations to all the prize winners.  We hope everyone who enjoyed a day in the fresh air in our gorgeous State Parks felt like a winner! Thank you for joining […]

World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims 2016

By Sarah Newsum from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 24, 2016.

Families mourn 400+ lives lost on Oregon roads in 2016 with vigil This past Sunday, November 20th, Oregon and SW Washington Families for Safe Streets, held […]

“Behind The Scenes” with our Executive Director

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

Learn a bit about the Foundation from our Executive Director, Seth Miller,  from this recent interview with KXL-FM’s Brett Reckamp http://bit.ly/2eYNe54

Watch your waste this holiday

By Jen Coleman from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

Oops. In 2015, Oregonians generated slightly more waste and recycled slightly less than in years past, according to DEQ. We created 2,553 pounds of waste per person, or about 7 pounds a day—and we recovered slightly less than half of that for recycling, energy or compost. That’s not good news for our state’s goal, also adopted in 2015, […]

Weigh In: Help Shape Washington County’s Transportation Future

By Kate Walker from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

How will we get around in 40-50 years? This is the question posed in Washington County’s Transportation Futures Study. Share your thoughts on what transportation investments […]

Can Poetry Save Us from Our Global Environmental Crisis?

By admin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

I have to admit that, after decades of work as an environmental advocate, I still find it slightly awkward to tell people that my educational training is in fine arts. But if you think about it for a moment, it makes sense. Environmental solutions, just like poetry, require imagination, vision and passion. I’d bet that, […]

Women Bike November Recap

By Elizabeth Cabral from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

This November we partnered with Mujeres en Movimiento to celebrate Dia De Los Muertos, a traditional Mexican holiday that is about gathering with friends and family […]

Moving forward

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 22, 2016.

Thank you for being part of something bigger than yourself. And thank you for standing up for what you believe in.

4 Tips for Communicating With Empathy Across Differences

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Nov 22, 2016.

“We think we listen, but very rarely do we listen with real understanding, true empathy. Yet listening, of this special kind, is one of the most potent forces of change that I know.” – Carl Rogers As many of us… Read More!

The post 4 Tips for Communicating With Empathy Across Differences appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Act Now: Protect the Columbia from the world’s largest methanol refinery!

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 22, 2016.

Methanol refining and export explained in 4 minutes. Now’s a great time to learn the facts about the world’s largest methanol refinery proposed on the banks of the Columbia River in the small town of Kalama, Washington. The risks are high and this small town needs your help. Watch our new video and see how you can make a difference.

Bartonberry outplanting in Hells Canyon

By Meaghan Petix from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Nov 22, 2016.

Over the last two years, the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) has been developing propagation protocols to grow Bartonberry (Rubus bartonianus) from seed and cuttings, so that it may be reintroduced to the historic range, to maintain its historic global distribution. In addition to IAE staff, Matt Bahm, Erin Gray, Denise Giles-Johnson, and Meaghan Petix, […]

As The Year Ends, a Letter from our Director

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Nov 21, 2016.

Dear Friends and Supporters, While wetlands are adaptable by their nature, threats like climate change, rising sea levels sprawl and competing water uses may be more than they can withstand. Without healthy wetlands * We lose natural resiliency that create refuges of green during droughts. * The oysters, crab and salmon won’t have the clean

On Replanting

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Imagine that you were told by your neighbor that he was going to tear down your house, rip out your plumbing, (and spray you with a blend of chemicals (something we won’t get into here). In response to your protests, he just calmly told you not to worry: “Oregon law requires that I rebuild it.” […]

What Feels Important Today

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Celebrating the real on #GivingTuesday November 29th. How do we capture the hearts and minds of our community? This is the question we “non-profiters” are always thinking about, especially when #GivingTuesday is upon us.  It is not enough that we know our work is important, that our community needs the services we provide, the lands

2016 Elections: Moving Forward

By admin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Listening, learning and taking action. It’s what we’re witnessing right now across Oregon, and it’s the strategy we’ve embraced since 1968. Oregon Environmental Council holds at its very core a simple idea: if we come together to find common ground, we will succeed in protecting what we love. Please join us in this spirit of […]

Hidden and Forgotten Oregon Old-Growth Treasures

By guest from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Emile Shelter Big Tree — 12’ 7” dbh, about 200’ tall — one of the largest Douglas firs in Oregon

By Darryl Lloyd

This past year my brother Darvel and I have been doing a lot of bushwhacking and exploring for big trees in Oregon, Washington and northern California. In June we visited a couple of relatively small and unknown old-growth areas of Oregon. They are Emile Creek in Umpqua National Forest east of Roseburg, and Tall Trees Trail in Willamette National Forest east of Eugene. Both are off the beaten path and ignored by outdoor writers and guidebook authors. Not only should these areas receive permanent protection, but trails, roads and signs should be maintained. I hope people who care will make noise and spur action!  

At Emile Creek we walked only a short distance on old logging roads and forgotten little trails to marvel at a couple of giant Douglas firs. They rank among the largest in Oregon. The Emile Shelter Big Tree (at about 4,300 feet elevation) is the largest at a whopping diameter (dbh) of 12 feet 7 inches and a height of about 200 feet. We carefully measured the diameter several times. It was considerably greater than what was shown on a sign next to the tree. About a mile-and-a-half to the west is the Bill Taft Tree at 10 feet 10 inches dbh and approximately 235 feet in height. Our diameter on this tree matched within an inch of what was posted on a sign. Both groves of remnant old-growth ecosystems were small, but beautiful and complex on the forest floor. Let’s hope they will be permanently protected.

According to the Forest Service the the Tall Trees Trail east of Eugene: "Hiking this short trail gives you the chance to see some of the Northwest's tallest trees. The grove contains 500-year old Douglas-firs measuring an average of 300 feet in height with the tallest measuring 322 feet (see an example to the right). The center of the grove consists of approximately 50 acres of the tallest trees ranging from 270 to 310 feet tall. There is an abundance of tall snags in the stand. Interpretive signs provide insights about this ecosystem.”

Well, how could we resist going there? But big-tree expert and arborist, Mario Vaden reported recently on Facebook that the height of the tallest trees were around 280 feet. But that’s still mighty tall. And anyway the long drive to the trailhead was worth the effort. What’s sad is that the trail hasn’t been maintained for a number of years, and the beautiful interpretive signs are slowly becoming unreadable. It’s a perfect short old-growth hike into a little creek drainage that somehow escaped the wrath of logging. I hope that Oregon Wild readers will check it out and then tell the Forest Service that the trail should be maintained. And of course, the small remnant area of old-growth should be protected for all time.    

To squeeze in a few words about why Darvel and I are so passionate about protecting ancient forests. Our interest in forest giants began when we were little kids back around 1953, when our late forester father (Les Lloyd) showed us the world’s largest Douglas fir at the time, near Cannon Beach, Oregon. He discovered and saved the tree in 1938 while employed as a timber cruiser. The “Clatsop Fir” blew down in the Columbus Day Storm of 1962. 

For the past 10 years or so, we’ve been photographing, exploring and documenting the oldest and largest known trees of a variety of species in Oregon, Washington and California. Our measurements, however, are only approximate and crown-width must be taken into account for official volume determinations. Only certain tree experts (not us!) make official measurements. Even though we're pretty confident in our estimates of "largest known trees," we would be delighted to learn of even bigger ones found and documented by someone else. Someday we’ll put together a website of our favorites.

Emile Creek

 

 

Tall Trees Trail

 

 

Emile Big Shelter Tree

 

 

Bill Taft Tree

 

 

Photo Credits: 
Darryl and Darvel Lloyd

Fossil Fuel Industry Will Not Grow in the City of Portland

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Portland is poised to make history by passing binding land use rules that ban new fossil fuel infrastructure. Final vote scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 8 2016, is postponed and will be rescheduled **tentatively** for Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016, (stay tuned for updates).

Join For Every Kid in Eugene on December 6th!

By Sarah Newsum from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 16, 2016.

Join us for a fun event in YOUR community! The For Every Kid Coalition is hosting a Safe Routes to School Town Hall on Tuesday, December 6th in […]

Act Now: A permit to pollute? No thank you.

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 16, 2016.

Proposed coal exporter Millennium Bulk Terminals won’t get the hint. Help us flood the Washington Department of Ecology and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with comments to protect our water from dirty coal export. Please submit your comment today!

It’s Holiday Party Time!

By Lauren Hugel from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 16, 2016.

You’re invited to our holiday party potluck! When: December 8th 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Where: BTA headquarters! 618 NW Glisan, Suite 401 Who: Free for members, […]

BNSF Railway Required to Address Coal Train Pollution

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 16, 2016.

"We are pleased that BNSF will seek to cover its dirty coal trains and clean up the pollution they've already spilled. It’s the simple solution.The railroad is not above the law." -Brett VandenHeuvel, Executive Director of Columbia Riverkeeper

UPDATE #3 Portland Moving Forward Against New Fossil Fuel Infrastructure

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Sometimes it takes a long time for things to happen quickly — in this case, good things.  Portland City Council is finally poised to approve unprecedented zoning restrictions on new fossil fuel infrastructure (FFI) for export or storage, before year’s end.  This process began in 2015, culminating last November with a pair of unprecedented binding policy […]

What do you know about wood smoke?

By Jen Coleman from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Myths and Facts About Wood Smoke Is the ambiance of a fireplace and the coziness of a wood stove worth serious health consequences? As we head into winter, take a moment to learn more about the downsides of wood smoke and how to reduce health impacts on your neighbors and your family. Myth: Wood is a […]

Holiday Open House December 9th

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Open house for members and supporters at our office on Friday, December 9th,  7:30 p.m. through 9:00 ish.  Feel free to bring cookies, refreshing beverages, etc.  We will have food, wine, hot mulled things, and good cheer!  (We may need a little extra this season!) Who: You and HCPC members What: Holiday Open House When: […]

The Importance of Connection, Reflection and Action

By Kerry Lyles from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

When the world changes around us, especially unexpectedly, we are faced with so many questions. Some of us may wonder what this means for ourselves, our family, our community, our faith, and our work. Some of us may spiral into… Read More!

The post The Importance of Connection, Reflection and Action appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Finding Common Ground

By Joe Whitworth from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Water doesn’t take sides — it connects them. It threads together communities and

The post Finding Common Ground appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Time to speak for the trees! Portland residents, please contact City Council ASAP and urge them to: (I) Allow more tree preservation and planting with residential infill. Make changes in the Residential Infill Project proposal in order to: allow automatic adjustment in front and rear lot line setbacks (for structures and parking areas) in order […]

Afloat in Alaska: On a Charging River where the Salmon Run

By Corinne Smith from Conservancy Talk. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

The Susitna is one of the last free-flowing rivers in the United States. Millions of pink, chum, Chinook, sockeye, and coho swim up its powerful current each summer to reach their spawning grounds.

Restore Wild Salmon – Remove the Lower Snake River Dams!

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help. Please attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria! […]

Podcast: Felicia Marcus, California State Water Resources Control Board

By Joe Whitworth from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

Felicia Marcus has one big job – one few would ever covet. She’s

We won’t stop working for clean water and healthy rivers for all

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

Fellow River Lovers, For many on our staff the past few days have felt very dark, we like many others are afraid of what is coming. We’ve dedicated our lives to protecting the rivers of the Pacific Northwest for the good of all people and we’ve heard many messages from the President-elect that run contrary … Continue reading We won’t stop working for clean water and healthy rivers for all

Join NWEI’s 11/17 Webinar: Engaging Your Community With NWEI Programs

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

Regardless of where you stand on the political spectrum, the months ahead will require all of us who are working to address environmental and social issues to step up and engage our co-workers or community members in making sustainable and just… Read More!

The post Join NWEI’s 11/17 Webinar: Engaging Your Community With NWEI Programs appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Union Pacific Rail Double Track Project through Mosier, OR Denied

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 13, 2016.

At their Nov 10th meeting Wasco County Board of Commissioners voted 3 – 0 to finalize their Nov, 3rd decision to deny the permit for Union Pacific’s proposed rail expansion. To read more about the decision http://gorgenewscenter.com/wasco-county-commissioners-complete-their-denial-of-union-pacific-plan-for-second-main-line-track-at-mosier/ Highlights from the Nov 3rd Wasco Board of Commissioners meeting: Gary Kahn, an attorney representing Friends of the […]

After the election: Turning a negative into a positive

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 12, 2016.

The presidential election was a shock to many of us. After some reflection over the past few days, I have a new outlook. As the new President of Recycling Advocates, I’d like to share that perspective with you as we start looking ahead to 2017 under a new political landscape. 1) We have momentum on […]

Dia De Los Muertos Bike Ride Recap

By Elizabeth Cabral from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 12, 2016.

On November 2nd, Women Bike partnered with Mujeres en Movimiento to celebrate Dia De Los Muertos. Dia De Los Muertos is a traditional Mexican holiday centered […]

Standing up for public lands

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

Let’s stand together for public lands. If you have been taking your public lands for granted, this year has been a wake-up call to rise in support of our natural heritage.

Time for Stone Soup: Remembering the Power of Community

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

In the span of a few days, we have turned the corner into what is undoubtedly a very uncertain future. Over the next few years the opportunity for our work together is even greater. We will need to work proactively at… Read More!

The post Time for Stone Soup: Remembering the Power of Community appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Update from our Executive Director

By Kate Walker from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

No one ever said that fighting for the things we believe in was going to be easy. Today, it’s important to remember that we don’t fight […]

You never know what you might learn when you get a Ticket2Ride!

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

KGW’s Grant’s Getaways recently aired a story about our new Ticket2Ride program. Click the picture to check it out here:

Sunnyside Coffee Perks in Portland

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 10, 2016.

Sunnyside (Portland) has great coffee shops!  Go ahead and sit and stay awhile….the aroma, creative spaces, artwork, comfy indoor and outdoor seating are inviting you to linger.  When you do, ask for a “cup for here” or “to stay” or “a ceramic mug, please,” or offer up your own travel cup (BYOC) and pass on […]

What do we do now?

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 09, 2016.

That was a divisive election. I’ll leave it at that. Today is a time of uncertainty. But here is what I know. Together, we will continue to protect what we love – clean water, the health of our families, and wild places that inspire.

Thank You for Six Great Years

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Nov 09, 2016.

20161109
1000 Friends of Oregon and Jason Miner
Wed, 11/09/2016 - 12:10pm

Today we are proud to announce the transition of 1000 Friends of Oregon’s Executive Director Jason Miner to serve as Oregon’s next Natural Resources Policy Director in Governor Kate Brown’s cabinet.

read more

Newsletter Archives

By Adrienne Welsh from . Published on Nov 07, 2016.

Did you miss an eNewsletter? You can read past issues on the website, you’ll find them under Resources -> Newsletters.

Mauka to Makai: Community Conservation from Mountains to Oceans

By Christine Woll from Conservancy Talk. Published on Nov 07, 2016.

We were busy lashing tall poles together, building a traditional Hawaiian hale, or grass house, when a young man introduced himself to me.  “Do you work for The Nature Conservancy too?” he asked.  His name was Bert Weeks, and he was a Hawai’i Marine Fellow for the Conservancy. We were both participating in E Alu […]

4k Voices Call on Oregon to Deny Mega-Dairy Proposed in Boardman, Oregon

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Nov 04, 2016.

Today we call on the Oregon Departments of Environmental Quality and Agriculture to deny the water pollution permit for Lost Valley Ranch, a proposed 30,000 cow confined animal feeding operation. Oregon has heard from over 4,000 people asking for denial of this project. The Lost Valley Ranch factory farm would generate waste on par with Portland, but the manure would not go to a wastewater treatment plant. Instead, the factory farm would flush its waste into giant, lined earthen pits where it would decompose and then be dumped onto neighboring fields. This threatens water quality in the Columbia River and nearby drinking water sources that are already degraded by pollution. The State of Oregon cannot give the green light to this project without addressing the serious public health and environmental impacts ignored in the draft permit.

Annual Volunteer Meeting scheduled for Jan 26th

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 04, 2016.

Join us on Thursday January 26, 2017 for Recycling Advocates’ annual volunteer gathering! We will share updates on our BYOC campaign and strategize the next phase, and discuss volunteer opportunities over the next few months. Wine, beer and snacks will be provided. Save the date! More details will be posted soon.

The Path Forward on Climate – It’s About Us Now

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Nov 03, 2016.

President and CEO Mark Tercek shares how we can tackle climate change and reduce emissions by innovating technology, investing in solutions, shaping policy, and taking individual action.

Oregon Politicians Attempting to Roll Back Hard-Fought Protections for Salmon and Floodplains

By aberman from News. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

After years of effort by Portland Audubon and other conservation groups, Oregon is poised to implement important and long overdue protections for Oregon’s floodplains (flood-prone areas). However, some Oregon politicians are now doing the bidding of big developers and trying to make a last-ditch effort to undo these reforms. We will need your help to send a strong message to the Governor and the Oregon Delegation that they need to support these reforms and put protection of our communities, our environment, and our economy above the profits of irresponsible developers.

Celebrating Mexican Cuisine from Maya Forest to Chef’s Plate

By Rane Cortéz from Conservancy Talk. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

“You said this was only nine kilometers?” I asked our guide as we emerged from the steamy Mayan jungle into the late afternoon sun. “Nine kilometers through the forest. Now we just have to ride back to the village—but it’s on the road, so it’s like nothing,” he responds. I shoot him a look as […]

Donate to the BTA through Give!Guide and Win!

By Lauren Hugel from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

The Willamette Week’s Give!Guide – a year-end celebration of local non-profits doing great things in our communities – kicks off today! The BTA (soon to be The […]

The Hook Brings You Back

By Adam Chenoweth from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

In my short time living in Jawbone Flats, I have paid attention to what brings people […]

Goal Set to Raise $10K Through Give!Guide

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

This morning, we were up early. Today’s the kickoff for Willamette Week’s Give!Guide,

The post Goal Set to Raise $10K Through Give!Guide appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Open and Accountable Elections Portland

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

The Problem Many communities face barriers to their voices being heard in our democracy.  One in three Portlanders are people of color, and yet we have only had two people of color ever serve on our City Council.  The majority of our population is female and we have had just seven women on the City […]

EcoChallenge 2016 Collective Impact!

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

Just last week EcoChallenge 2016 wrapped up with 8,351 participants on 450 teams! Together, we had quite an impact. In two short weeks we saved over 45,000 plastic bottles and over 19,000 disposable cups from going to the landfill. We conserved… Read More!

The post EcoChallenge 2016 Collective Impact! appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

For Every Kid Campaign Update: YOU are this movement.

By Sarah Newsum from Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

The For Every Kid Coalition is focusing on the 2017 legislative session and the fight for dedicated funding for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) education programs and street […]

Teaching the Way of the Wolf

By guest from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

by Joanie Beldin

"In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught." Baba Dioum

WolfWays plants seeds - seeds of hope for our wolves. It was founded out of concern for the ongoing persecution of wolves worldwide. Age old misperceptions and exaggerated fears continue to be perpetuated by the media. How and when will it end? The answer may lie in the future - in the teaching of our young people who will then understand the truth about wolves and with understanding will learn to love and will learn to care. They are the future stewards - our hope lies in them.

To this end, Oregon Wild, along with Wolf Haven International,  is helping to sponsor the wolf education program known as WolfWays

"I really enjoyed your presentation. I liked your enthusiasm. I like wolves a lot better now because of your presentation." Julian, student in a 1st-3rd grade classroom.

The children are learning that this almost mythic animal lives here in their state. They learn where they live and are captivated by the story of OR7, fondly known as Journey. They come to understand the devoted family life of wolves and wolves' vital role as keystone species.

The kids take home wolf posters and share what they've learned with their parents. Through the children, WolfWays reaches adults as well. According to a mom, her preschool child talked about wolves non-stop after the presentation! The presentations inspire students to share what they learned and spread the word about wolves.

In addition to giving presentations, WolfWays' tabling spreads the word about wolves at community events. In the spring of 2015, WolfWays created the Wolf Howl Campaign - encouraging young people to draw pictures and write letters to send to the Fish and Wildlife Commissioners asking them to not delist the wolves. Six classrooms participated and over 100 letters were submitted at the Bend hearing! A first annual Wolf Celebration Day, filled with activities and programs for kids and adults, is in the works for next spring.

How you can help

WolfWays aims to reach as many young people, ages 4 to 13, as possible. Adult presentations are available as well. This is an all volunteer program that provides this educational service free of charge. Your help in finding venues for WolfWays' presentations is invaluable and could make a big difference.  It could be your child's classroom, scout program, library, homeschool, nature center, or ???  Do you enjoy making contacts? WolfWays would love your help!  

To share venue ideas, volunteer interests or just to learn more, please contact wolfways.edu@gmail.com. The wolves will give a hooowwwllling thanks!

For more information on this program, please visit the WolfWays webpage.

Tags: 

Moving forward from the Malheur Refuge takeover

By Gena Goodman-Campbell from Press Releases. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Earlier this year thousands of people from all across the country expressed their peaceful opposition to the armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Today those thousands of people and millions of Americans from all walks of life continue to cherish the public lands that belong to all of us.

Where we go from here...

By sean from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

I’m not sure if I have ever been more shocked than I was yesterday when I heard the verdict in the trial of the seven militants who staged an armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Like you, I was left wondering how a band of bullies who filmed themselves trying to provoke a bloody showdown with law enforcement, destroying public property, and desecrating Native American artifacts could be found not guilty?

Legal scholars may debate this verdict for years to come.  But for Oregon Wild, and for all Americans who love our National Parks, Wilderness Areas, Wildlife Refuges, and other public lands, the more important question is where do we go from here?  For us, the answer is we can’t let the Bundys win, we must dig deep and expand our work to defend America’s public lands.

Ammon and Ryan Bundy (and many others involved in the Malheur occupation) still face charges for their role in the Bunkerville stand-off in Nevada. They are not yet walking free.  And this verdict in no way legitimizes the Bundy’s twisted interpretation of The Constitution.

But I am worried that grazing, logging, and mining interests will use this ruling to promote their schemes to transfer America’s public lands to the states and counties.  They know full well those entities don’t have the resources to manage them and would have no choice but to privatize.  And I am deeply concerned for the safety and wellbeing of the scientists, rangers, and law enforcement officers who work for the US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Forest Service, and other agencies. We don’t always agree with them, but no American should face violence and intimidation for doing their jobs.

Throughout our 40 year history, Oregon Wild has always stood up to threats and intimidation from bullies who would despoil our state.  We are not going to stop now.

We are going to work even harder to defend our beloved public lands. Thanks to support from the Wyss Foundation, I am proud to report we are expanding our programs and hiring a new Public Lands Fellow to work with outdoor recreation enthusiasts, outdoor businesses, state and local elected officials, communities of color and others to ensure America’s public lands remain public and open to all.  

But this alone will not be enough to protect our national heritage. All who cherish public lands must advocate for them and demand that our elected leaders respond with courage to those who believe “might makes right.” Now is not the time to shrink from this fight. We must call on Senator Wyden, Senator Merkley, Governor Brown, and President Obama to protect more of our public lands for future generations.

I hope you will join us.

For the wild,

 

Sean Stevens
Executive Director

 

 
Photo Credits: 
The Malheur Wildlife Refuge by Jim Maloney

Audubon Society of Portland Statement on the Verdict in the Malheur Occupation Case

By aberman from News. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Audubon Society of Portland is deeply disappointed by the jury’s verdict in the case of seven defendants who occupied Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in early 2016. We respect the legal process, but believe that the armed occupation of public lands, which included destruction of public property and disturbance of Native American archaeological sites, should have resulted in substantial penalties.

5 Ways to Take Your EcoChallenge Into the Future

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Today is the final day of EcoChallenge 2016! This has been our largest EcoChallenge yet, with over 8,200 participants and 448 teams representing all sectors of society. In two short weeks we’ve come together to try out new habits or… Read More!

The post 5 Ways to Take Your EcoChallenge Into the Future appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Before the Flood: the Must-See Climate Change Film by Leonardo DiCaprio

By Joanna Benn from Conservancy Talk. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s Before The Flood, which premiered in Europe on October 15th at the London Film Festival, may prove to be the most influential movie detailing the state of our climate since Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth—both in terms of box office draw, and in its hard-hitting urgency and painful illustration of the impacts of runaway climate change. […]

Solar Inclusion Project

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Oct 26, 2016.

The Marys Peak Group (MPG) has developed a project to support the Sierra Club’s efforts to increase the use of solar power and to become more inclusive of diverse communities. Up to this point, the marketing target and users of solar energy have primarily been restricted to the upper economic classes of our society. The […]

Seed Collection in Oregon’s Remaining Coastal Prairies

By Jeanette Hardison from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Oct 26, 2016.

Starting in 2015, IAE was awarded an opportunity to engage in collecting seed of a diversity of plant species from remnant prairies on the Central Oregon Coast. The project will support ongoing restoration efforts for the Oregon silverspot butterfly (OSB) at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge near Pacific City, and will benefit other restoration sites […]

Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Regain Salmon-Bearing Wetlands in Ancestral Homeland

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

The purchase of the Fivemile Creek property restores Tribe’s ancestral homeland while protecting critical coho salmon habitat. Continue reading

Solar Development on Resource Lands

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

20161025
Farmers Advisory Committee
Tue, 10/25/2016 - 2:15pm

1000 Friends' Farmers Advisory Committee weighs in

Below is the text of our letter to the Land Conservation and Development Commission

Dear Honorable Commissioners:

The Farmers Advisory Committee (FAC) was formed to assist 1000 Friends of Oregon in protecting, implementing and improving Oregon’s program for maintaining the agricultural land base needed for farming and ranching. The FAC is composed of commercial farmers and ranchers, and farm organization leaders. The FAC members come from all of Oregon’s agricultural regions and produce a wide variety of farm products.

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The White House shows how to say "YES in my Backyard!"

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

20161025
Mary Kyle McCurdy
Tue, 10/25/2016 - 1:30pm

Yes in my Backyard is what we need to make Oregon housing accessible for every resident. 

read more

Land Use Leadership Initiative Tours Southwest Corridor

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

20161025
Andrew Riley
Tue, 10/25/2016 - 10:00am

On Saturday, October 8th, 1000 Friends of Oregon's Land Use Leadership Initiative (LULI) began a 9-month training program with a tour of the Southwest Corridor area in the Portland metro region.

read more

EcoChallenge Day 12! Impact & EcoChallenge Giveaway

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

Happy Day 12 of the 2016 EcoChallenge! With only three days left, we’re in the final stretch! With over 8,100 participants on 444 teams we’ve already saved over 26,000 plastic bottles from going into the landfill, travelled over 11,700 miles… Read More!

The post EcoChallenge Day 12! Impact & EcoChallenge Giveaway appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

The Oregon Desert Trail invites you to get inspired

By Renee Patrick from Press Releases. Published on Oct 24, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) is presenting a series of events west of the Cascades that will inspire you to head over the mountains and discover the high desert on your next hiking trip. The 750-mile Oregon Desert Trail begins right outside of Bend in the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, and through a series of trails, old 2-track roads, and cross-country travel, hikers will discover mountains, deserts, rivers, and canyons to end in the stunning Owyhee Canyonlands area.

Infographic: The Freshwater Trust in California

By Danielle from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Oct 23, 2016.

Last spring, Erik Ringelberg, California Director, turned the key to his new office

The post Infographic: The Freshwater Trust in California appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

EcoChallenge Halfway Mark! Top Teams and Impacts To Date

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Oct 21, 2016.

Today marks the halfway point in EcoChallenge 2016! With one week left, over 430 teams and nearly 8,000 participants will continue to taking action and making a difference for themselves, their communities, and the planet. We’re excited to share some of… Read More!

The post EcoChallenge Halfway Mark! Top Teams and Impacts To Date appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

From data to trails: An intern's tale

By guest from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Oct 19, 2016.

Greetings!

My name is Jenessa Dragovich, and as a lifelong Oregonian and nature enthusiast I have respected and admired Oregon Wild’s work for a long time. This summer, I had the opportunity to work with Oregon Wild as a Conservation Technology Intern. Looking out for public interests, Oregon Wild tracks proposals on Oregon public lands and gets involved by reviewing, commenting, and sometimes legally challenging proposed activities that threaten our wild lands and wildlife. My main contribution to their efforts was to revamp the database program that they use to track projects through the NEPA process, subsequent timber sales, or the court system. My hope/goal was to leave them with a more efficient, functional, and robust tool so that they can keep up the amazing advocacy work that they do on behalf of all Oregonians concerned about the welfare of the wild places and wildlife held in the public trust. 

In addition to working on the database, I was fortunate to also get out and hike in some of our beautiful native forests. I love old growth forests. Ab-so-lute-ly love them. Personally, I feel a similar spiritual (for lack of a better word) contentment when among ancient trees as I do when I visit the ocean. Both settings remind me of my place in this world and simultaneously make me feel tiny and insignificant and yet intimately connected to something much grander than my mere human existence. Mundane stresses seem to melt away and I live and breathe—more than at any other time—in the moment. I treasure finding this state of mind and find that I need periodic doses of it to survive the daily grind. Oregon Wild’s mission is to protect these invaluable places that provide so much more than mere board feet. 

One of the breathtaking places I was introduced to was the Bunchgrass Ridge hike, a segment of the not-yet-completed Eugene to Crest trail. We scouted the trail conditions for an upcoming hike to be led by Oregon Wild. Hidden meadows with bear grass clusters and wildflowers were sprinkled in between old growth forests and occasional rock outcroppings that yielded breathtaking vistas of several iconic Cascade peaks. Part of what makes this particular hike so special is that it borders the 1991 Warner Creek burn site. I can remember the nearly year-long occupying protest against salvage logging the post-arson timber. It seemed such an injustice that a forest that was off limits before the fire could so easily become up for grabs as a result of a crime. In the end, the salvage was canceled and Warner Creek stands now as a beautiful example of how well—and how vastly different in contrast to clear cuts—forests can recover and regenerate themselves, naturally. 

To my delight, I was introduced to old growth forests in my own backyard.  Another scouting mission for an upcoming hike took us to the Middle Fork Willamette trail. We saw beautiful natural springs, Indigo Springs and Chuckle Springs as well as several small unnamed ones, gurgling up along our path. As we followed the trail along the river we even meandered through yet another burn site—this time from the 2009 Tumblebug fire which jumped the river to scorch a small portion of the forest along the middle fork trail. We finished our trip with a small excursion to an old growth grove with giant Douglas firs and massive western white pines. Thanks to my time with Oregon Wild, in addition to the professional experience, I now have a new “favorite place” to explore!

Photo Credits: 
Photos by Jenessa Dragovich

Planned Gift Profile: Jerry Wayman Lansdowne

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Oct 19, 2016.

On the front of Jerry Lansdowne’s celebration of life card are two photos,

The post Planned Gift Profile: Jerry Wayman Lansdowne appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Call for Nomination Petitions

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Oct 18, 2016.

Sierra Club Oregon Chapter Executive Committee welcomes nominations by petition! Each year a portion of the Sierra Club Oregon Chapter’s elected at-large Executive Committee (ExCom) reaches the end of their terms. Some decide not to run again, others do. The Chapter uses democracy to hold itself accountable to its membership, so we need good candidates […]

Consumption, Conservation, and Commitment: Lessons from Borneo

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Oct 14, 2016.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness,” wrote Samuel Longhorn Clemens in Innocents Abroad. “Charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”  With Mark Twain’s admonition in mind, this summer John Bliss (OSU Professor Emeritus and Greenbelt board member) led a class of OSU students to explore conservation on the island of Borneo, one of the world’s great hotspots of biodiversity.  Their objectives were to identify major conservation challenges, learn from conservation leaders, and make connections between the Borneo situation and their own in the Willamette Valley. It wasn’t difficult to identify the biggest Read More

UPDATE #2: Portland Fossil Fuel Policy Zoning Heads Back to City Council

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Oct 13, 2016.

By Ted Gleichman, policy advisor, Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas & Oil Team A governmental journey of a thousand miles begins with scaling multiple bureaucratic mountains – a step at a time.  Portland’s path to Keep It In the Ground – working to ban new fossil fuel storage and export infrastructure – got major trailblazing […]

Beyond Gas & Oil Campaign Work

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Oct 13, 2016.

The Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas and Oil Team (BG&O) is doing awesome work throughout the region to  move Oregon and the Pacific Northwest in the right direction—away from dirty fossil fuel extraction, transport, and export. A summary of their ongoing work on gas infrastructure and oil trains is below. Contact Gregory Monahan, Chair of the Beyond Gas […]

Rally sends clear message to State Land Board: “Keep the Elliott Public”

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Oct 13, 2016.

On October 11th, nearly 125 Oregonians from across the state gathered on the lawn of the State Land Board building in Salem to send a loud, colorful, and clear message to the State Land Board: the Elliott State Forest needs to be protected and it needs to be kept public. Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of […]

How the Greater Hells Canyon Region Will Help Species Suvive Climate Change: Connectivity Is Key

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Oct 06, 2016.

Guest Blog by Marina Richie, HCPC’s newest board member.  Welcome, Marina! Have you ever watched the play of light and shadows on the bunchgrass shoulders that pitch down into Hells Canyon? Have you savored the summit of Eagle Cap on a cloudless morning with dizzying views of alpine lakes and peaks in all directions? Have […]

Notes from the Field: Milkweed & Monarchs

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Oct 05, 2016.

Over the course of the past two years, TWC neighbor and avid volunteer Sue Reed planted 8 milkweed plants at  our Nyberg Wetland Preserve. Sue chose to plant the beautiful plant with showy flowers to help support monarch butterfly habitat. Well known for their long-distance seasonal migration and winter gatherings in Mexico and California, the

Wetlands & Wellies 2016

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Oct 05, 2016.

            Thank you to our sponsors, chefs, brewers, vintners and distillers for making Wetlands & Wellies 2016 such a successful event. Sponsors Pacific Birds Habitat Joint Venture The Boeing Company Wolf Water Resources Metro Pembroke Asset Advisors LLC Hahn and Associates Lango Hansen Landscape Architects Pacific Habitat Services ESA Kern

Partners Join to Protect Mongolia’s River Wolves

By Tuguldur Enkhtsetseg from Conservancy Talk. Published on Oct 03, 2016.

They call them “river wolves.” The endangered taimen fish of Mongolia is the world’s largest member of the salmonoid family.

ONDA volunteers perform restoration work at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Oct 02, 2016.

Fifteen Oregon Natural Desert Association volunteers pulled roughly 1.5 miles of obsolete barbed wire fence over three days at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Oregon.

Exploring the Willamette River

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Oct 01, 2016.

Over the past few years, I’ve traversed the Willamette River in all four seasons. The open Piney Woods, flooded ravines, and the bank of the Willamette provide some unique ecological niches and spectacular vistas. This year, I walked all the main trails of Willamette Park and several of the overgrown paths connecting them. I plan on making my own map with some whimsical place names. This photo journal covers the spring and summer seasons.                     Blog post and photos by Rick Kleinosky. Rick is a Corvallis resident, valued Greenbelt Land Trust member, and celebrated local photographer. You’ll often Read More

Space Prom in Jawbone Flats

By Barrett Zimmerman from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

The sound of the tractor rumbles up the hill as I stroll down from my cabin. […]

Save Our Elliott State Forest

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Sep 29, 2016.

Governor Kate Brown and the State Land Board are considering a proposal to sell off the Elliott to logging corporations. Located in the Southern Oregon Coast Range, theElliott State Forest is a 93,000-acre state owned forestland containing some of Oregon’s last remaining coastal old-growth. Approximately half of the forest is over a century old. It provides a […]

Innovative Solutions for Nature and Climate

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Sep 29, 2016.

Read Mark Tercek's thoughts on collaborating to scale up natural climate solutions, from his recent speech at The Environmental Council of the States' fall meeting.

New Faces!

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Sep 28, 2016.

We are thrilled to announce two new recent hires within the Oregon Chapter of Sierra Club! Magda Mendez-Martinez  joins us as our new Outreach and Development Coordinator.  In her new role, Magda will be to coordinating and assisting with with chapter fundraising campaigns, membership and volunteer engagement, strategic communications and marketing efforts, as well as capacity […]

Yes on Affordable Homes

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Sep 27, 2016.

20160927
Welcome Home Coalition
Tue, 09/27/2016 - 2:10pm

Providing for the most vulnerable among us

Portland is experiencing an unprecedented housing crisis. For every five families that qualify for affordable housing assistance, there are only two units available—and that’s a generous estimate.

read more

Recent Land Use Wins

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Sep 27, 2016.

20160927
Mary Kyle McCurdy and Meriel Darzen
Tue, 09/27/2016 - 1:30pm

Partners, Affiliates, and Cooperating Attorneys all see successes

We are thrilled to highlight some significant Land Use Wins from our partners and Affiliates.

First on the docket, Friends of Yamhill County v. Yamhill County (Hintermeyer) – a 1000 Friends Cooperating Attorney Program (CAP) case.

read more

Nectar Cafe first to join Coffee Cup Reduction Campaign

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Sep 23, 2016.

Thanks to Nectar Cafe PDX for joining the Bring Your Own Cup Campaign! Table tents have been delivered for display near the condiment station. Please support their great coffee bar and vegetarian/vegan food options in the Hollywood district in NE Portland. Close to the old theater, and behind the US Bank. I personally like the […]

Oregonians Applaud House Introduction of Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Bill

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Sep 23, 2016.

September 23, 2016 — Portland, Ore—Today, Congressman Peter DeFazio introduced a bill that would protect roughly 100,000 acres in Douglas County, Oregon. The legislation was introduced by Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley in the Senate in May, 2015, and passed out of the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources in July, 2016. The Frank … Continue reading Oregonians Applaud House Introduction of Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Bill

Fall Gala on October 22, 2016!

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Sep 22, 2016.

Saturday, October 22, 5 – 9 pm Catholic Church Parish Hall 1002 L Avenue, La Grande, Oregon  Please join us for a special night of socializing, celebrating, fundraising, and getting energized to protect, connect, and restore our wonderful corner of the planet. Tickets are $25 for adults; $10 for youth ages 5 – 12; and […]

Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary B-Roll

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Sep 22, 2016.

B-Roll is courtesy of Shane Anderson. To download click on the thumbnail or the text below the thumbnail. big pool with fish clear underwater no fish cloudy underwater with fish river at eye level river from above rushing water

Tom Simpson joins Oregon State Parks Foundation Board

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Sep 22, 2016.

The Oregon State Parks Foundation welcomes Tom Simpson, Director of Government & Regulatory Affairs at The Standard, as the newest member of its Board of Trustees. Mr. Simpson represents The Standard before federal, state and legislative bodies and other public policy decision makers. In addition to the Foundation Board, Mr. Simpson is a member […]

2017 Member Reservations Now Open

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Sep 21, 2016.

2017 cabin reservations for our Cedar and Pacific Yew members are now open! Cabin reservations for the […]

Protections for the Oregon Spotted Frog

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Sep 20, 2016.

After years of illegal grazing, KS Wild and our allies have secured an initial court victory that requires the Forest Service to do its job and protect rare frogs and their fragile riparian habitat.

Nedsbar Timber Sale

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Sep 20, 2016.

KS Wild filed a formal protest on September 15 2016.

Where Does Your Wind Energy Come From and Is It Really ‘Green’?

By Mike Fuhr and Katie Hawk from Conservancy Talk. Published on Sep 20, 2016.

Recognizing that renewable, low-carbon energy is essential, The Nature Conservancy has developed a wind siting tool to address these concerns about impacts to sensitive habitats and wildlife.

Tackling the Climate Challenge

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Sep 19, 2016.

"Science is once again guiding us on the next big step in our evolution: addressing the climate challenge." Watch Mark Tercek's speech from the American Climate Leadership Summit.

Desert Conference: Public Lands, Common Ground brings diverse voices to Bend October 14

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Sep 16, 2016.

The 2016 Desert Conference will bring landowners, conservationists, elected officials, scientists and engaged citizens together in Bend on Oct. 14 to explore shared solutions for managing our public lands.

Giving Pokémon GO a Go

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Sep 14, 2016.

The Challenge What do you do when you are tasked with entertaining three hungry and restless 9-year-old boys? This is the challenge that Claire Fiegener, Greenbelt’s Conservation Director, faced one afternoon. Her twin sons and their friend were jumping around because they were super psyched to play Pokémon GO. They invited me to tag along so I could see first-hand what this craze is all about. Claire and I had no clue what Pokémon Go was about, or why it has become the latest virtual craze. What is the allure that has kids and adults alike walking through the streets day and night totally oblivious Read More

Explore the Oregon Desert Trail by Boots, Bike or Boat

By Corinne Handelman from Press Releases. Published on Sep 12, 2016.

Join the Oregon Natural Desert Association and the Mountain Shop to learn about new opportunities to explore your public land on the 750 mile Oregon Desert Trail; on foot, by bike or packraft. Our adventure panelists will discuss the value of public lands and importance of proper gear to set out on your next Eastern Oregon exploration!

Patchmarks creates collectible Oregon State Parks Patches and Stickers

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Sep 09, 2016.

Patchmarks.com has designed some great Oregon State Parks patches and stickers. You can purchase them on their website and a portion of the proceeds go to the Oregon State Parks Foundation! Visit their website to see which ones are available. Over the next several months they will be releasing more and you can signup on their […]

We are gearing up for Ticket2Ride!

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Sep 08, 2016.

We want to ensure that all kids have access to our State Parks – to appreciate and learn about nature. Ticket2Ride is a program that will help do just that! This fall, we are teaming up with Ecology in the Classroom & Outdoors and an Encore Fellows from Intel to get 5th graders, from 9 schools in the Portland […]

Another great Invasive Species Cook-Off!

By Jeanette Hardison from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Sep 08, 2016.

The 5th annual Invasive Species Cook-Off & Potluck, IAE’s annual party and fundraiser, was held at the Benton County Fairgrounds on Saturday, August 27th, 2016. Cook-Off contestants planned their dishes for days, weeks, even months in advance.  Hunters and gatherers headed out at dawn and dusk to collect invasive bullfrogs and clams, while others harvested fresh […]

UPDATE: Portland Fossil Fuel Policy Work Moves from F to B-Minus

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Sep 07, 2016.

By Ted Gleichman, policy advisor, Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas & Oil Team Portland’s Bureau of Planning & Sustainability (BPS) has proposed zoning amendments for review by the Planning & Sustainability Commission (PSC) that are substantially less destructive than the agency’s original plan.  But “less bad” does not equal “good.” BPS was charged with implementing […]

Portland Rocks Hard Against the TPP!

By aharris24 from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Sep 02, 2016.

By Alexander Harris On Saturday, August 20, over a thousand Oregonians came together in downtown Portland to “Rock Against the TPP” with musicians, comedians, and activists from around the country. The concert tour’s stop in Portland not only had outstanding music and spectacular speeches, but also featured a photo petition with huge props (TPP Death […]

Judge: U.S. Army Corps Illegally Authorized Cormorant Killing on Columbia River

By aberman from News. Published on Sep 01, 2016.

A federal district court ruled late Wednesday that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers acted unlawfully by failing to consider alternatives to killing double-crested cormorants on the Columbia River.

Unsung “Willamette Warrior” Crew Leads by Example & Ethic

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Sep 01, 2016.

“Time in nature is not leisure time; it’s an essential investment in our children’s health (and also, by the way, in our own).” ― Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder   The Put-in On the water, we’re all headed downstream… and so is our trash. Where does it go? Out-of-sight, out-of-mind? The solution to pollution is dilution? Some would erroneously believe so until you are the one to float through it, swim in it, drink it, irrigate with it, or yes, step in it, along its banks. So, who are the brave souls who clean it up? Who are these Read More

Planting the Future in Salem

By Randi Orth from Growth Rings. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

Friends of Trees is gearing up for a massive season of trees in Salem and our first priority is to make sure that all trees have what they need to succeed. This means we need YOU! Yep, you! We are actively recruiting volunteers to be a part of our volunteer Crew Leader team in Salem to […]

South Hillsboro: A few thoughts on a new development

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Aug 30, 2016.

20160830
Alyson Marchi-Young
Tue, 08/30/2016 - 11:35am

It was announced that a planned community in Hillsboro will finally be breaking ground, with an expected 8,000 new units of housing for upwards of 20,000 residents.

read more

Al Kitzman receives 2016 Ecological Conservation Award

By Tom Kaye from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Aug 29, 2016.

The 2016 Ecological Conservation Award was presented to Al Kitzman for his long-term contributions to habitat restoration in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  Al retired in 2014 from the Benton County Natural Areas and Parks Department after 34 years of service.  He managed several natural areas and parks for their habitat and recreational values, including […]

‘A great reward for the effort’: Volunteer Christopher Masciocchi Shares Why it is Great to Be a Neighborhood Coordinator

By Randi Orth from Growth Rings. Published on Aug 25, 2016.

If volunteering with Friends of Trees has been on your radar or you are just looking for ways to contribute to your community–you are in the right place! Friends of Trees is seeking dedicated volunteers for a variety of roles in the coming planting season. Today we are highlighting Christopher Masciocchi, volunteer Neighborhood Coordinator to East […]

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Threatened Marbled Murrelet From Logging on Former Elliott State Forest

By aberman from News. Published on Aug 25, 2016.

Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity and Portland Audubon filed a lawsuit in federal court today seeking to block Scott Timber Company from logging a portion of a 355-acre parcel of land that until 2014 was part of the 93,000-acre Elliott State Forest and provides habitat for the threatened Marbled Murrelet.

Reminder: Recycling Advocates Annual Meeting on Sept 14, 2016

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Aug 22, 2016.

Here’s a reminder to RSVP for Recycling Advocates’ Annual Meeting on September 14th at 7:00pm. Doors open at 6:30pm. * Agenda coming soon, including Coffee Cup Reduction campaign updates * Meet our new board members. The event is free and open to all Recycling Advocates members and friends. What: Recycling Advocates Annual Meeting 2016 When: […]

Opal Creek Fire Ban

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Aug 22, 2016.

Beginning August 22, the Opal Creek Scenic Recreation Area is on a complete fire ban. Due […]

Lettin’ the Fun Flow!

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Aug 16, 2016.

Cascadia Expeditions had the pleasure of collaborating with Benton County Natural Areas & Parks and Greenbelt Land Trust to deliver an exceptionally fun experience for youth on the Willamette River. Joining after a morning of hiking, we were happy to deliver a few games and enjoy lunch river side before splitting up into teams and diving into the rafts for our float. Pointing out various interesting sites along the way, and making a few stops to install duck nesting boxes, these kids were simply pumped to be outside paddling, learning about ducks, other wildlife, ecology, and river currents, and of course…to be getting wet! The weather Read More

Summer Potluck 2017

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Aug 15, 2016.

It’s August again, and time for our Annual Summer Potluck!  This was one of our favorite events last year, and we can’t wait to see you at it again! Who: You and any new friends you care to bring! What: A casual potluck packed with amazing food and great conversation about conservation in the Greater Hells Canyon Region today.  All of HCPC […]

Wild & Scenic Film Festival brings best outdoor, conservation films to Bend on September 9

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Aug 12, 2016.

Experience rock climbing in Lebanon, skiing in Antarctica and more when the Wild & Scenic Film Festival makes its stop in Bend on Friday, Sept. 9. Tickets are on sale now for two screenings at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend.

Clean Water, Healthy Soil

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Aug 11, 2016.

The Tualatin Soil and Conservation District has served the people of Washington County since 1955. The District is asking voters to approve a permanent tax levy to provide services needed to protect the water, soil, and other natural resources in Washington County. The resource needs of the region exceed the District’s ability to provide services. […]

Sharing lessons learned

By Peter Moore from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Aug 09, 2016.

Recently the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) and Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM) exchanged site tours for staff involved in habitat restoration. This was a great opportunity to exchange ideas, discuss the control of problem weed species and see different stages of restoration projects - all in a similar, yet unfamiliar environment. On May […]

Pacific Rivers Challenges BLM Replacement of the Northwest Forest Plan

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Aug 09, 2016.

August 9, 2016 — Eugene, Ore—Late Yesterday, Pacific Rivers and a coalition of stakeholder groups filed a lawsuit against the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and its Resource Management Plan (RMP) for western Oregon. The RMP, which directs management of 2.5 million acres of forested lands in western Oregon would replace the 1994 Northwest Forest … Continue reading Pacific Rivers Challenges BLM Replacement of the Northwest Forest Plan

A Summer Full of Trees

By Randi Orth from Growth Rings. Published on Aug 08, 2016.

Hey! My name’s Bryan, and I am working as an intern (via the Duke Engage program) for the summer here at Friends of Trees. In my position, I support both the Neighborhood Trees and Green Space programs as they perform necessary administrative and maintenance tasks in between planting seasons. We don’t plant in the summer […]

Will Portland Abandon its Pledge Against New Fossil Fuel Infrastructure?

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Aug 08, 2016.

By Ted Gleichman, policy advisor, Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas & Oil Team Last November, the Portland City Council voted unanimously for a binding policy resolution to stop any fossil fuel exports through Portland and to ban new fossil fuel infrastructure for exports or storage.  This unprecedented measure put Portland on a state-of-the-art path for […]

Farewell to the Field

By IAE/NPSO Intern from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Aug 08, 2016.

The Conservation Research field crew completed our last work trip of the season, camping near Coos Bay and working on BLM land amidst the sand dunes of the North Spit.  After many weeks of camping and working out in the desert of eastern Oregon, we were all excited to spend a week on the coast, […]

Second Year of Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Aug 08, 2016.

The Foundation is working with the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department to increase uses of the parks by students and schools in order to connect the parks with education. The second session of Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute, conducted this June in partnership with Eastern Oregon University, is just one example of how state parks can […]

Oregon Sierra Club August Events

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Aug 07, 2016.

August 17th: Time To Choose – Portland Join NAACP Portland Chapter and Oregon Sierra Club, Columbia Network for a special screening of Time To Choose and featuring a special keynote address by social justice activist, leader, and NAACP Portland Chapter President Jo Ann Hardesty. Climate change is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced – and […]

Rock Against the TPP Coming to Portland!

By aharris24 from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Aug 05, 2016.

By Alexander Harris This summer, the Sierra Club is working with the OR Fair Trade Campaign and over 40 labor and environmental groups to plan Oregon’s largest anti-Trans-Pacific Partnership event ever! On August 20, over a thousand Oregonians will come together for Rock Against the TPP, a nationwide concert tour meant to raise awareness of the threats of the TPP. The weekend of action […]

Planting Plans for Washington State SPP Sagebrush

By Jessie Brothers from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Aug 04, 2016.

Aug 3rd , 2016 — Twenty thousand inmate-grown Wyoming sagebrush plants will be planted in the Swanson Lake Wildlife Refuge area fall of 2016. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) have been working together for years to manage adjacent parcels of land for wildlife habitat. Specifically, for Greater […]

Urban Growth Boundaries

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jul 28, 2016.

20160728
1000 Friends Staff and Board
Thu, 07/28/2016 - 12:20pm

It's time to double down on their protection

You may already know UGBs are the single most contested aspect of Oregon’s land use planning program. UGBs make Oregon different by giving landowners certainty, shaping our cities and towns, and enabling our agricultural economy to thrive without risk of urban sprawl. Today UGBs face a pressing threat: special interests are claiming they drive up housing costs.

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A Diverse Portland-Metro Area

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jul 28, 2016.

20160728
Andrew Riley
Thu, 07/28/2016 - 12:10pm

Still Experiencing Stark Disparities

Metro's latest Regional Snapshot makes it clear: the Portland region is growing more diverse every year. Communities of color now make up over a quarter of the metro area's population, but still experience stark disparities.

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A Special Privilege

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jul 28, 2016.

20160728
Jason Miner
Thu, 07/28/2016 - 12:00pm

Oregon Wineries and Commercial Activity

Over three legislative sessions and in innumerable conversations in Salem from 2011 to 2013, 1000 Friends championed protecting farmland for farming alongside vintners and winemakers. Wine industry leaders worked to define what are and are not acceptable practices on wine lands.

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Living Legends: Jack Broome & Althea Pratt

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Jul 26, 2016.

By Larry McClure, Tualatin Life Behind the big hedge next to the WES station you can barely see Tualatin’s only building on the National Register of Historic Places, the 1858 Sweek House. John and Maria Sweek and descendants made a permanent mark on early city history.  But it is two residents in this remarkable house

Elected Officials Race in Canoes and Kayaks August 6, 2016

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Jul 25, 2016.

The winner is… Tigard City Councilor John Goodhouse. Also participating (L to R) … State Rep Joe Gallegos Jen Nelson, Tualatin Soil & Water Conservation District Forest Grove City Councilor Victoria Lowe Mark Jockers, Clean Water Services Washington County Commissioner Roy Rogers Tigard City Councilor John Goodhouse (winner) Washington County Commissioner Dick Schouten Team Gallegos Tualatin […]

A New Life in a Different World

By Bryan Kurz from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jul 25, 2016.

It’s hard to describe exactly what Opal Creek is without experiencing it for yourself. For me […]

Rooster provides coffee cups to RA for latest campaign

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Jul 22, 2016.

They’re here! Our awesome stainless steel coffee cups with our logo have arrived! The cups are sponsored by our friends at Rooster! They ordered 96 cups for us to give out at tabling events. They also updated our logo into a vector-format, to make it better for printing on the cups. Rooster is a website […]

Sign Up for Summer Hike July 30th

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jul 19, 2016.

Hey Nature Lovers—join us for a hike on Saturday, July 30th in Wallowa County! We’ll hike up the beautiful Hurricane Creek Trail to the Slick Rock Creek crossing, for a total of 6.5 miles. Last summer, a wildfire burned in parts of the Hurricane Creek drainage. We’ll get a look at it one year out, […]

Beautiful Evening + Community = Great Stories of Watershed Health

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Jul 19, 2016.

Last month, twenty Kellogg Creek neighbors joined The Wetlands Conservancy and The North Clackamas Urban Watersheds Council (NCUWC) for a summer evening potluck. The picturesque, streamside Cavalier HOA park in Milwaukie provided the background for a night of storytelling. Long-time residents and watershed newcomers shared their overall appreciation of the place they all call home

The Wetlands Conservancy Re-Accreditation Public Comment Period

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Jul 19, 2016.

The Wetlands Conservancy received accreditation from the Land Trust Alliance five years ago and is applying for renewal of our accreditation in September 2016. Accreditation recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national standards for excellence, uphold the public trust, and ensure that conservation efforts are permanent. Accredited land trusts meet national quality standards for protecting

Critical Steelhead Sanctuary Bill Moves Forward Through Senate

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Jul 15, 2016.

Pacific Rivers worked with Senator Wyden to introduce a bill that will conserve approximately 100,000 acres of critical steelhead habitat in Douglas County, Oregon. This bill has now passed through the U.S. Senate’s Energy and Natural Resource Committee, and will now move forward to the Senate floor for a vote. Senate Bill 1448 accomplishes two … Continue reading Critical Steelhead Sanctuary Bill Moves Forward Through Senate

East Face Vegetative Management Project Review

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jul 14, 2016.

The East Face Vegetative Management Project. Those of us who live in Union and Baker Counties have probably heard this name kicked around, but might not know the details of this timber project, especially as the details have changed over time. This blog takes a look at what East Face has become and how Hells […]

Oregon Bottle Bill pioneer Don Waggoner dies at 81

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Jul 12, 2016.

As a husband, businessman, volunteer and activist, Don Waggoner was renowned for his broad range of work — from pioneering the nation’s first “bottle bill” to saving a community center in Northeast Portland. But his friends, colleagues and loved ones say that his generosity and modesty will be remembered above all else. Waggoner died at […]

Remembering Deb

By aberman from News. Published on Jul 09, 2016.

Deb Sheaffer, Portland Audubon’s Wildlife Veterinarian, passed away on July 5, just a little more than a month after she learned that the cancer she had battled so bravely last summer had returned. Our deepest condolences go out to Deb's husband Ron, her children, Nate and Mary, and all those who knew and loved her.

The First Every YIMBY Conference

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jun 29, 2016.

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Madeline Kovacs
Wed, 06/29/2016 - 12:10pm

Yes in my Back Yard is gaining steam

Earlier this month, Portland for Everyone staff attended the first ever “YIMBY” (Yes in My Backyard!) conference, convened in Boulder, Colorado.

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Meet the 2016 Summer Interns!

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jun 29, 2016.

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Tim Kerkhove and Elise Nelson
Wed, 06/29/2016 - 11:30am

The Gerhardt and DukeEngage Interns are here

1000 Friends of Oregon is pleased to introduce our summer interns. If these two are any indication of our future leaders, we will all be better for it.

Tim Kerkhove - 2016 Gerhardt Intern

read more

Greater Protections Sought for Threatened Marbled Murrelets in Oregon

By aberman from News. Published on Jun 21, 2016.

Conservation groups submitted petitions today asking the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Oregon Board of Forestry to take new measures to better identify and protect important forest areas for protected marbled murrelets.

Stand with Kate and Nancy to demand responsible logging

By Natalie Bennon from Pacific Rivers. Published on Jun 21, 2016.

By Kate Taylor and Nancy Webster —  The water smells strangely like a swimming pool. Water pouring from the kitchen tap. Water we drink. Water we serve to our families, pets and friends. Water we bathe in. It all smells like chlorine. One of us (Kate) moved to Rockaway Beach, Oregon a few years ago … Continue reading Stand with Kate and Nancy to demand responsible logging

Oregon Appeals Court Set to Rule on Plan to Sell off Elliott State Forest

By aberman from News. Published on Jun 15, 2016.

The Oregon Court of Appeals is set to decide the legality of a 788-acre timber sale on the Elliott State Forest following a court hearing last Friday.

Groups Plan to Sue over Pacific fisher

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Jun 14, 2016.

KS Wild was joined by several conservation groups who plan to sue the federal government for backtracking on more than a decade's worth of studies when it failed this spring to list the Pacific fisher as a threatened species, saying isolated populations, including those in southwest Oregon, warrant protection.

The Real Hazard to the Public? Forest Service Logging of Imnaha River Corridor

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jun 13, 2016.

Guest Blog by Marina Richie (HCPC supporter, La Grande, Oregon) Last week, I drove up to my favorite place, the upper Imnaha River, for two nights of camping among the glorious ancient pines, big firs, and larch.  However, from the junction by Ollokot Campground heading upriver toward Coverdale, Hidden, and Indian Crossing Campgrounds, I saw […]

New and updated materials now available for Oregon Desert Trail

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Jun 13, 2016.

New tools and updated information are now available to help plan adventure on the Oregon Desert Trail, a 750-mile route through Oregon’s high desert.

Detective Work in the Ancient Forest

By Claudia Christensen Garcia from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jun 10, 2016.

I moved to Jawbone Flats in March with the understanding that I would spend the spring […]

Summer Breezes at Opal Creek

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jun 06, 2016.

Summer days are here again! Here’s what it takes to have the best Opal Creek experience this […]

Ruling protects Greater Sage-Grouse on Steens Mountain

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on May 26, 2016.

A three-judge panel from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a ruling May 26 that rejects the Secretary of the Interior’s approval of an industrial-scale wind project proposed for Steens Mountain.

Great Blue Heron Week: June 1 - June 12

By aberman from News. Published on May 26, 2016.

Join us for Great Blue Heron Week and explore Portland's official bird as you discover natural areas all around the city.

Tremendous sugar pines in the Applegate

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on May 23, 2016.

The Butte Fork trail is the lowest elevation and most gentle of all the hiking routes in the Red Buttes Mountains. There’s a lot to love about this route through the last untouched valley in the upper Applegate, including wildflowers, views of the snowy Siskiyou Crest ridgeline and the cascading of the Butte Fork and its tributaries. Surprising old-growth Sugar Pines along the trail to Cedar Basin will not disappoint.

You can help protect water and salmon on Oregon state forests

By Natalie Bennon from Pacific Rivers. Published on May 20, 2016.

The Tillamook and Clatsop state forests in Northwest Oregon are beloved by many Portland-area residents. They are less crowded than the Gorge and Mt. Hood. More wild than Forest Park. And filled with beautiful rivers and streams, strenuous hikes and bike rides, and places to reconnect with nature when you only have a few hours … Continue reading You can help protect water and salmon on Oregon state forests

Cormorant Nesting Colony Targeted by Federal Agencies Suffers Complete Failure

By aberman from News. Published on May 20, 2016.

Audubon Society of Portland calls on federal agencies to permanently stop the slaughter of cormorants and immediately launch a comprehensive investigation of the killing program

Evening for Opal Creek–Thursday, May 19!

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on May 12, 2016.

Our annual fundraising bash is in just a few days, and we’ve got a great evening […]

River groups intervene in Oregon timber lawsuit

By Natalie Bennon from Pacific Rivers. Published on May 12, 2016.

May 12, 2016 — Portland, Ore. — Pacific Rivers and three partner organizations – Wild Salmon Center, Association of Northwest Steelheaders, and Northwest Guides and Anglers Association – have entered the fray in a lawsuit brought by Linn County against the State of Oregon and the Oregon Department of Forestry. The river groups have intervened … Continue reading River groups intervene in Oregon timber lawsuit

River groups to BLM: protect water on federal forests

By Natalie Bennon from Pacific Rivers. Published on May 09, 2016.

Pacific Rivers and its partners are pushing back against industry efforts to cut more timber on federal forests in Oregon. In April, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released its final plan for managing 2.5 million acres of public lands and waters in western Oregon – the so-called O&C lands. This new plan is an attempt … Continue reading River groups to BLM: protect water on federal forests

Plan Your Summer Adventures with Tualatin Riverkeepers

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on May 04, 2016.

This Summer Tualatin Riverkeepers has a big menu of adventures for you to experience.  Canoe trips, kayak trips, the ever popular waterfall tour, River Professors Lectures and a new event, the Bird & Wine Tour are planned for you.  Join our group events. Check out the complete menu  and register online at our Eventbrite Page. […]

Update: Westside Salvage Logging

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on May 03, 2016.

Clearcutting has started in the recovering post-fire "Westside Salvage" logging units. KS Wild is supporting the Karuk Tribe in emergency legal motions that will ask the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in early May to halt the logging while affected wildlands and wildlife get their day in court. Cross your fingers and stay tuned as we continue to do all we can to promote real restoration and protect forests and watersheds of the Marble Mountains from clearcutting.

Safety Video Emphasizes the Right Life Jacket Fit for Kids

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on May 01, 2016.

Tribe AND Conservationists File Suit to Protect Wild Salmon, Rural River Communities

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Apr 27, 2016.

The Karuk Tribe, along with the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center (KS Wild), Center for Biological Diversity, and Klamath Riverkeeper, filed suit in federal court challenging a massive post-fire logging plan in Klamath National Forest that will increase fire danger, degrade water quality, and harm at-risk salmon populations. The Tribe leads a diverse plaintiff group united by a common interest in restoring healthy relationships between people, fire, forests and fish.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Announces Inexplicable Decision to Reverse Course on Protecting Rare Forest Mammal

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Apr 14, 2016.

Agency abruptly withdraws proposed rule that would have protected the Pacific fisher under the Endangered Species Act.

Tips for Safe Paddling on the Tualatin River

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Apr 14, 2016.

On April 12, 2016 a kayaker was rescued from the Tualatin River 1/2 mile downstream of Cook Park by TVFR and Clackamas rescue teams.  Those familiar with this stretch of the river know that this shallow location always has current.  At springtime flow levels, the kayaker was unable to paddle upstream.  She was wearing a […]

National Marine Fisheries Service Releases Biological Opinion Requiring Stronger Floodplain Protections for Salmon and Communities

By aberman from News. Published on Apr 14, 2016.

On April 14, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) concluded that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) must change its implementation of the National Flood Insurance Program in Oregon to better protect imperiled salmon, steelhead and Southern Resident Killer Whales. In its biological opinion (BiOp), NMFS concludes that FEMA’s flood insurance program violates the Endangered Species Act by subsidizing development in floodplains that jeopardize the continued existence of salmon, steelhead and Southern Resident Killer Whales and adversely modifies the designated critical habitat of anadromous fish species in Oregon. The BiOp includes a list of reforms FEMA should implement that will not only protect federally listed salmon, steelhead, and killer whales but will also reduce flood risks to people and property.

US Army Corps Begins 2016 Cormorant Slaughter

By aberman from News. Published on Apr 11, 2016.

On Wednesday April 7, the US Army Corps and USDA Wildlife Services began shooting Double-crested Cormorants near East Sand Island. Federal agents in boats are using shotguns to shoot birds out of the sky as they fly and forage in the Columbia River Estuary. Conservation groups have expressed deep disappointment that the Federal Government would initiate the 2016 killing season despite the fact that the federal court has indicated that it hoped to rule on the legality of the lethal control program before the killing began in 2016.

High Desert Speaker Series Wraps with New Look at Old Favorite: the John Day

By paul@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Apr 11, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association's High Desert Speaker Series concludes in Portland on April 25th at 7 p.m. with the talk, Hidden Wonders of the John Day, by ONDA Stewardship Director Ben Gordon.

High Desert Speaker Series finale in Bend

By paul@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Apr 11, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association's High Desert Speaker Series finale in Bend takes place on April 26 at 7 p.m. with a special presentation from ONDA Central Oregon Wilderness Coordinator Gena Goodman-Campbell.

West Coast Forage Fish Protections Mean Big Things for Seabirds

By aberman from News. Published on Apr 05, 2016.

After more than three years of hard work, Audubon Society of Portland and our partners, including Pew Charitable Trusts, Audubon California, Oceana, and Audubon Washington, have secured a huge win for forage fish species. As of May 4, 2016, dozens of forage fish species will gain federal protection under a new rule from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Thank You River Connections Sponsors

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Apr 05, 2016.

Thank You Premier Community Bank, Metro, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Backyard Bird Shops, and NW Natural.

New website launched

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Apr 03, 2016.

The updated website is now live as of April 3rd. We changed the site to a new platform, that will make it easier to update, and will allow for more functionality. The key enhancements of the site are: Coffee cup reduction campaign Pledge to reduce coffee cup usage Recent news/posts Other ways to help RA […]

Shopping at Amazon helps Recycling Advocates

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Mar 11, 2016.

When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as the regular Amazon.com website, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to your favorite charitable organization. There is no cost to you! You can now select Recycling Advocates as […]

Feds reject Jordan Cove LNG terminal

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Mar 11, 2016.

Federal regulators have rejected plans for a liquefied natural gas terminal in Coos Bay. On Friday, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied applications from two Delaware companies to site the massive Jordan Cove Energy Project in the Southern Oregon coastal town.

Portland Audubon's Statement on Environmental Debate

By aberman from News. Published on Mar 03, 2016.

Audubon Society of Portland is a 501(c)(3) non-profit. As such, we do not endorse candidates. However, we do participate in the election process to ensure that environmental issues are well considered and that the public understands how candidates will approach these issues.

Help Build the Cottonwood Canyon Experience Center

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Feb 24, 2016.

Less than $100,000 left to go! You can help bring the Cottonwood Canyon Experience Center to life - creating an inspiring space for learning about all of the wonders that John Day River Territory has to offer.

Nature Day Camp Registration is Now Open

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Feb 23, 2016.

REGISTER BY APRIL 15 FOR THE EARLY DISCOUNT Tualatin Riverkeepers’ summer day camp program welcomes youth between the ages of 4 and 13. Camps foster an appreciation and love of nature through place-based, hands-on experiential learning: lessons and activities are designed to develop campers’ self-confidence, problem solving skills, and understanding of their ecological niche. While […]

High Desert Speaker Series continues in Bend

By elisa@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Feb 12, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association’s High Desert Speaker Series continues in Bend on March 15 at 7 p.m. when Chuck Gates, founding board member of the East Cascades Bird Conservancy, will present details of the lives and behaviors of the many fascinating birds that call Oregon’s high desert home.

Audubon Society of Portland Statement on the End of the Occupation at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

By aberman from News. Published on Feb 11, 2016.

February 11, 2016: The last occupiers of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge surrendered to federal authorities this morning, ending the illegal armed occupation of Malheur. Audubon Society of Portland appreciates law enforcement officials who worked to bring this illegal occupation to a close, Malheur Refuge staff and their families who were displaced by this occupation, and the local community who strongly rejected this occupation.

Thankful for the end of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge takeover

By Lindsay Jones from Press Releases. Published on Feb 11, 2016.

As the media trucks pull out and the wheels of justice move forward, the Oregon Natural Desert Association vows to remain committed to the health and welfare of the Malheur Refuge.

ONDA to release its 2016 calendar of guided restoration trips

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Feb 01, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association offers guided restoration trips throughout eastern Oregon every year. Registration for this year's slate of trips opens Friday, Feb. 12.

Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board Awards up to $6 Million Grant for Collaborative Conservation to Improve Aquatic Health and Wetlands in Harney County

By aberman from News. Published on Jan 29, 2016.

The Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) voted Tuesday (January 26, 2016) to allocate more than $1.6 million to support a diverse partnership working to improve habitat values and water quality in Malheur Lake and other Harney Basin wetlands.

KS Wild Joins Statewide Actions to Support Public Lands

By Amy from KS In The Press. Published on Jan 21, 2016.

"We're going to be positive. We're going to be peaceful and we're going to talk about how much we love public lands."

BLM disagrees with O&C's timber harvest goals

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Jan 18, 2016.

The Bureau of Land Management says it isn't mandated to offer up timber harvest of 500 million board feet identified in the 1937 O&C; Act, because its analysis shows that isn't sustainable.

Update: Malheur Refuge occupation

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Jan 14, 2016.

ONDA condemns the takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and adamantly urges our elected officials to take a leadership role in reaching a swift, peaceful resolution to this unprecedented act of hostility.

Press Release: McKenzie Camp acquisition

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 30, 2015.

The McKenzie River Trust protects clean water and salmon habitat near Blue River following a land acquisition from Rosboro. Continue reading

It’s the trees

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 21, 2015.

Thanks to you, an oak woodland and working forest is protected. Continue reading

The New Clean Water Service Permit: What would be good for the Tualatin River and our neighborhood creeks?

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Nov 25, 2015.

After many years of delay, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is about to renew the permit that allows Clean Water Services (CWS) to discharge wastewater and stormwater to the Tualatin River system. There are some great innovations in the draft permit.  Clean Water Services will be permitted to use “natural treatment systems” at Fernhill […]

The New Clean Water Service Permit: What would be good for the Tualatin River and our neighborhood creeks?

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Nov 25, 2015.

After many years of delay, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is about to renew the permit that allows Clean Water Services (CWS) to discharge wastewater and stormwater to the Tualatin River system. There are some great innovations in the draft permit.  Clean Water Services will be permitted to use “natural treatment systems” at Fernhill […]

‘Safe Harbors’ for native fish

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Nov 17, 2015.

This is part of a series about the MRT members who have played a part in the incredible comeback of Oregon chub. In the coming days and weeks, we’ll share more stories of MRT members who aided the recovery. ‘Safe … Continue reading

The importance of healthy floodplains

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Nov 11, 2015.

Because of members like Art and Anita Johnson, we've helped Oregon chub recover. Continue reading

Beers Made By Walking comes to Eugene

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 30, 2015.

8 local breweries have created beers inspired by hikes on MRT lands, and you can taste the results. Today Continue reading

The little fish that we’d never noticed

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 30, 2015.

George Grier and Cynthia Pappas protected their land in 1992. They didn't know then that they would play a critical part in the recovery of Oregon chub. Continue reading

Oregon chub makes a comeback

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 15, 2015.

Because of members like you, an Oregon native makes a comeback It was the early 1990s. Like many of our native fishes, the Oregon chub was in trouble. Chub lived their lives in the moist backwater channels and sloughs of … Continue reading

Have you seen the new Paddlers’ Map?

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Oct 06, 2015.

The new Paddler’s Guide to the Lower Tualatin River is now available at local paddling shops, libraries, and by mail from the Washington County Visitors Association.

HCPC’s Wildlife Watchers

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Apr 22, 2015.

Our Wildlife Watchers program bridges several important aspects of our conservation mission. We work in partnership with the Forest Service, we connect volunteers with local forests and wildlife, and we provide important wildlife data to the Forest Service to help inform management decisions. If you are interested in becoming a Wildlife Watchers volunteer in 2015, please […]

testing

By rocco from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on May 28, 2014.

testing sahring

By renewables from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on May 24, 2014.

Missing Tim Lillebo

By coldcoffeemedia from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Feb 17, 2014.

Hells Canyon Preservation Council recently lost a great friend when Tim Lillebo passed away.  Tim went out to shovel snow at his home in central Oregon on Saturday, February 8 and apparently died of a heart attack or another sudden critical health problem.  Along with Tim’s family and many friends, we are mourning his loss […]

Wildlife Watchers Field Report for 2013

By coldcoffeemedia from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jan 17, 2014.

From HCPC Restoration Director Brian Kelly: We were hoping that by the middle of last June that we’d be able to drive up to Dunns Bluff.  The bluff is an impressive rock outcrop near the edge of the Eagle Cap Wilderness.  But as we climbed higher and higher on the rough Forest Service road, we […]

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 31, 2010.

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 28, 2010.

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Temporary Rules Filed On Business Energy Tax Credit Program

By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Nov 03, 2009.

Nine Federal Agencies Enter into a Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Transmission Siting on Federal Lands

By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Oct 29, 2009.

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Energy issues are important to daily life

By renewables from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Oct 16, 2009.

Publication Date: 
July 20, 2010
As important as energy is to our economy and quality of life, it isn't surprising that energy issues are in the news on a daily basis these days. Dependence on foreign energy suppliers and on fossil fuels - which contribute to climate change - is not a strategy that is sustainable for our needs. Ultimately, a clean, secure, homegrown energy future will be needed to revitalize our economy and sustain us for the long-term.
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