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Join NWEI’s Next Course Organizer Training Webinar, April 13th!

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Mar 27, 2017.

Earth Day is just around the corner! We believe every person has the power to create positive action, and next month is a perfect time to do a little extra. These days, there’s no shortage of information about the serious challenges… Read More!

The post Join NWEI’s Next Course Organizer Training Webinar, April 13th! appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Start Rallying Your Team, the Bike Moe Challenge is Coming!

By Lauren Hugel from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 27, 2017.

It’s that time of year again. Thousands of people across Oregon are pumping up their tires, lubing their chains and checking their brakes as they get […]

In memory of Lloyd Anderson

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 25, 2017.

This week, friends and board members of Oregon Environmental Council will gather to remember former board member Lloyd Anderson, (1925 – 2017).  OEC Board President Rick Gustafson, Board Member Doris Penwell and former Executive Director Jeff Allen took a moment to share a few memories of Lloyd. Here’s what they had to say… Lloyd was a […]

When Clean Fuels Win, So Does the Climate, Our Air, Our Oregon

By Devon Downeysmith from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 24, 2017.

Good news in the environmental world can feel hard to come by these days. That’s why it’s more important than ever that we elevate and celebrate local success stories. SeQuential Biofuels is one of those local stories worth celebrating. An Oregon business that recycles used cooking oil, SeQuential takes waste that would otherwise be thrown […]

The Roundup for March 24, 2017

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 24, 2017.

Forest Service Asks Public’s Help with Train Maintenance – FSEEE Last year, Congress passed the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act, which calls for doubling the ... [read more]

SHOP & DRINK FOR THE TREES IN APRIL

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Mar 24, 2017.

You’re hungry. You’re thirsty. You love trees. You want your dollars to make a difference. You’re in luck! April is a big month for trees, community, and putting your dollars to work for good! Whole Foods Markets and 2 Towns Ciderhouse are teaming up to support trees + community this month!   April 5: Whole Foods Benefit […]

NuStar – Featured

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

Today, the City of Vancouver—with help from hundreds of local residents concerned about dangerous oil trains—ended NuStar’s bid to ship crude oil from the Port of Vancouver. Northwest communities are standing up to big oil, and winning! Read more

Footwise Hood River Keen Klean Sale: 3/25-31

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

Footwise Hood River will donate $10 from every pair of regular priced Keens to Columbia Riverkeeper from Saturday, March 25 - Friday, March 31, 2017.

NuStar Update: Vancouver Terminates Oil Train Terminal

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

The City of Vancouver, Washington, issued a decision effectively terminating NuStar’s oil-by-rail proposal, which would have increased oil train traffic along the Columbia River. In 2015, NuStar challenged the City of Vancouver’s decision to require an environmental impact statement for the proposed 22,000 barrel-per-day oil terminal. The City, with help from hundreds of local residents who supported the City’s concerns about dangerous oil trains, prevailed over NuStar and was granted approval to conduct an environmental impact statement.

Honoring Barbara Roberts and her Lifetime of Service

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

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Mary Kyle McCurdy
Thu, 03/23/2017 - 3:30pm

2017 Tom McCall Legacy Award

On March 18th, at our 2017 McCall Gala, we recognized the Honorable Barbara K Roberts for her lifetime of service to Oregon. The Tom McCall Legacy Award is given to those who have demonstrated a deep commitment to Oregon and our land use planning system. 

read more

Forest Service Asks Public’s Help with Trail Maintenance

By FSEEE from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

How do you maintain 158,000 miles of trails on a shoestring budget? Ask for volunteers. The U.S. Forest Service manages more miles of trails than any ... [read more]

Buying Bee Friendly: What It Should Mean

By Sharon Selvaggio from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

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We know that you care about pollinators and their well-being. People are eager to know that the food they eat and the plants they buy are safe for bees.

Press Release: Stakeholders Weigh In – Why Water Can’t Wait

By Stacey Malstrom from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Contacts: Stacey Malstrom, Oregon Environmental Council, (503) 508-7233 Jim McCarthy, WaterWatch of Oregon, (541) 708-0731 Chandra Ferrari, Trout Unlimited, (916) 214-9731 Oregon Lawmakers: Water Can’t Wait Stakeholders Weigh In on Why Oregon Must Prioritize Smart Water Management SALEM, OR — Today water resources experts, Tribal leaders, farmers, and environmental […]

American Fisheries Society, Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service Recognize Salmon River Restoration

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

PORTLAND, OR — The Freshwater Trust (TFT) and the Sandy River Basin Partners

The post American Fisheries Society, Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service Recognize Salmon River Restoration appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Rethinking the Perfectly Manicured Lawn

By Edie Powell from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

(By Edie Powell, Communications and Campaign Assistant)

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Do you wish that reducing your environmental footprint was as accessible as your front yard? Well it turns out that it is!

New quilt showcases McKenzie River Watershed

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

New quilt showcases McKenzie River Watershed “My family and I have been boating on the McKenzie River since 1981 and we love this place,” says Mary Nyquist Koons, a member of the McKenzie River Trust with her husband, James, since … Continue reading

2017 Oregon Active Transportation Summit Recap

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

Thank you to our speakers, panelists, attendees, volunteers, sponsors and planning committee for another great Oregon Active Transportation Summit! YOUR participation is vital in creating healthy, […]

March 22nd is World Water Day! 4 Things You Can Do To Help Conserve Water

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

Since 1993, World Water Day has been held every year on March 22nd to raise awareness around limited access to fresh, clean water for millions around the globe. Hosted by the United Nations, annual World Water Day campaigns have focused on improving… Read More!

The post March 22nd is World Water Day! 4 Things You Can Do To Help Conserve Water appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Update: Six weeks into the 2017 Oregon Legislative session

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

By Rhett Lawrence, Conservation Director As predicted in last month’s legislative preview, it’s been a challenging session in the 2017 Oregon Legislature. After several sessions with some real environmental accomplishments (but also partisan divisiveness), we knew we would have a hard slog in making much progress in 2017. So things have gone pretty much as […]

World Water Day – March 22

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

The United Nations dedicated March 22 as World Water Day in 1993. Since

The post World Water Day – March 22 appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Working to Make Oregon’s Clean Energy Power Grid a Reality

By gpmonahan from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Portland General Electric wants to build new fracked gas power plants which will lock us into decades of climate wrecking fossil fuel pollution. PGE’s own analysis shows that our future energy needs can be reliably and affordably met with clean renewable energy which will create hundreds of new green energy jobs for our region. There […]

Holcombe Waller: Climate Requiem

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Signal Fire's Tinderbox Residency Holcombe Waller to perform the first in a larger body of work that he will continue exhibiting, May 4-6, 2017, at Headwaters Theater, 55 NE Farragut St #9, Portland, OR.

Weigh-In: Portland Safe Routes to School Open Houses

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

With the voter-approved 10-cent increase in the local gas tax (Fixing Our Streets, May 2016), the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) projects to raise […]

A Very Wet Central Coast Tour

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Each year as a Wetlands & Wellies auction item, Paul Engelmeyer and Esther Lev offer a tour of TWC’s central coast preserves. The tour is an all-day adventure, touring TWC properties and restoration projects, meeting with land owners, and sharing stories and food with TWC’s coastal partners. This year our eight intrepid attendees embraced the rainy weather

The post A Very Wet Central Coast Tour appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Defend the Columbia: Shop & Talk at Portland Patagonia

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Columbia Riverkeeper is partnering with Patagonia to protect our land, water, and climate from new fossil fuel projects in Oregon and Washington. Join us for two upcoming events to defend the Columbia on May 6 and May 11 in Portland, OR.

April 29: Protect the Columbia from Coal, Oil, and Methanol Export

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Join friends and neighbors on April 29th to show your support for our river, our air, and our community. On this day, hundreds of thousands of people will come together in cities across the nation – including Washington DC – to make it clear that our future will ensure clean air, water and a stable climate for future generations. You don’t have to go to DC to participate, your local community needs you here.

March Member Spotlight: Lani Jo Leigh

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Lani Jo is inspired by artists and activists who are doing good. On April 30, 2017, she opens the Clinton Street Theater for a special evening to celebrate Pete Seeger. Bringing together musicians and film clips, it is a time to celebrate those fighting for clean water and inclusive communities. Read more here and raise your voice in song on April 30th.

Intercepting Garbage

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Alsea Bay is an important place for many reasons, incredible habitat for shorebirds, Coho and Chinook salmon, crab, eagles and sometimes brown pelicans seen diving for a meal. It is also a place that collects garbage after big storm events.  This is not something anyone would celebrate. However, it means that we have a short

The post Intercepting Garbage appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Update on the Campaign to Block the Proposed Kalama Methanol Refinery

By gpmonahan from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

Cowlitz County has approved a permit for the world’s largest gas-to-methanol refinery in Kalama, WA on the Columbia River, thirty-seven miles from Portland. The Department of Ecology has an opportunity to overturn this permit, and stop the project. A Chinese government corporation, Northwest Innovation Works LLC, plans to exploit inexpensive fracked gas and water prices […]

Aveda Earth Month 2017 Fundraisers

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 21, 2017.

April is Aveda Earth Month. Join us at one of their fun events or treat yourself to some pampering while supporting clean water. Thank you Aveda for your support and generosity, and for protecting the Columbia River.

HB 2667: Statewide Vision Zero Task Force

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 20, 2017.

UPDATE: We did it!! Thanks to everyone who asked, we pushed the House Committee on Transportation Policy to schedule a work session on  HB 2667. That […]

Hunting for OHV trails: An Intern's Tale

By guest from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Mar 20, 2017.

by Emma Gosser

As I stood in the middle of a dusty dirt road looking out across the Crooked River National Grasslands, I wondered how on earth I was going to find illegal ATV trails on this vast desert expanse. Though I knew there was enormous environmental importance to this landscape, to my untrained eyes there was nothing but sage, dirt, juniper and the occasional bird that flew across the skyline. Or so I thought. I soon discovered it was not hard to find illegal trails at all. They are everywhere. 

Illegal OHV trail heading into Wilderness

As part of my internship with Oregon Wild, I surveyed Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) trail systems  in the high desert of central Oregon. The goal of this hot, dusty exercise was to gather evidence to help fight a Forest Service proposal for an ATV trail system that would cut right through the heart of the Ochoco Mountains. There is rampant illegal motorized traffic on the Ochoco National Forest, yet the Forest Service claims that if a designated ATV  trail system were in place, there would no longer be a problem of illegal ‘user-created’ trails criss-crossing the forest.  Part of my job was to prove them wrong. 
 
I thought finding illegal trails in the dry summer would be a difficult task. I assumed the dry dust in the grasslands would blow over the tire marks thus concealing all but the most devastating or fresh tracks. Boy was I wrong.  As I drove, biked, or walked many road miles I would frequently find the evidence I was looking for; deep ruts in the earth where ATV’s had turned off in search of a new adventure. These user created trails were everywhere, open wounds of dead dry grass and sagebrush that lacerated the landscape. These wounds will turn into scars that will not heal for years. I soon realized how delicate this ecosystem is, for one reckless user could leave a lasting imprint.
 


 
Illegal spur trail at Henderson Flat

After the Crooked River National Grasslands, I surveyed the Henderson Flat and Millican OHV areas, hopeful that the ATV users there would recreate responsibly and stay on the designated route. What I found did not reflect my hopes. Branching off curves and trail intersections were dozens of illegal trails. Managers of the area even tried cutting down trees or putting up closed tape to block people from going off trail. Instead, people just went around the trees or ripped right through the tape. Recent tire tracks bypassing a sign saying “AREA CLOSED - OHVs ARE PERMITTED ON DESIGNATED ROUTES ONLY,” made me incredibly sad for this place. Henderson Flat OHV area has 18 miles of maintained trails. Within just a small section of this 18-mile trail system, I found many illegal trails that were obvious to my untrained eye. If this user group ignores the rules here, how can we expect them to respect the rules elsewhere? Will designating the Ochoco Summit OHV trails system really be different?
 
Rewarding this user group that blatantly breaks the rules with new trails through the heart of our beloved Ochoco National Forest and through the proposed Ochoco Mountains National Recreation Area is wrong. There is plenty of motorized access on our public lands. In central Oregon there are nearly 1,000 miles of designated trail miles on various sites. The Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests have a combined total of over 9,000 miles of mixed-use open roads to ride their heart outs on. To put that in perspective, if one was to drive for two weeks straight 24 hours a day at an average speed of 25 mph (the ATV speed limit on Oregon’s beaches) one would not be able to finish all the open roads and trails in central Oregon alone.  

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT

Illegal roads have proliferated from established trail systems like a festering wound.  If more trails are built, more illegal trails will be created. We should not incentivize new illegal trails. Instead, we need to protect this land for clean water, wildlife, and quiet recreation. 
  
I was born and raised in Oregon. I took this internship to help protect the land I love. Before this internship, like many Oregonians, I believed that Oregon’s natural areas were well protected.  As I have witnessed through the surveying of roads for illegal trails, our natural areas need our help. I spent the summer hiking through the Ochoco Mountains old growth forests, taking in the solitude and beauty of the area.  Before this internship I hardly knew where the Ochocos were, now they are one of my favorite places in Oregon. The Ochocos now more than ever need to be protected against this kind of high impact use.

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Rally for Water and Wildlife

By Sharon Selvaggio from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Mar 20, 2017.

Water is truly the source for all life. Where would we be without clean water to drink?

Let’s spare a few minutes to think about our fish. Oregon salmon and steelhead pass through urban, farm and forest lands during their freshwater residencies. Fry like to hang out in low-flow areas where pesticides can concentrate. In some watersheds, multiple pesticides commingle in streams downstream of urban and agricultural areas, and anything living in the water can’t avoid exposure.

How does one person make an impact?

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 20, 2017.

We, Columbia Riverkeeper, pledge that together we are stronger and we will not back down to threats to our clean water, our communities, our river. As a member and donor of Columbia Riverkeeper you are at every fossil fuel hearing fighting for clean water. This is our river and our home and we will fight for what we love. Please consider an additional gift if you are able.

Act Now: Water Can’t Wait

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 20, 2017.

It’s time to speak up for Oregon’s water Even as we experience one of the wettest winters in a decade, the future of Oregon’s water resources is uncertain, and NOW is the time to speak up. On March 22, 2017 – World Water Day – lawmakers will hear public testimony on the Smart Water Management bills […]

Nature doesn’t waste water. Why should we?

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 19, 2017.

Guest blog by Molly Winter, Program Manager for Recode. Recode – Recoding for Sustainability – is an OEC partner working to accelerate adoption of sustainable building and development practices Unlike nature’s water cycle, when we use water for urban, agricultural or industrial systems, humans create wastewater. Wastewater carries pharmaceuticals, metals, fertilizers and other pollution into our rivers, […]

More Nurseries Support Pollinators

By Megan Dunn from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Mar 19, 2017.

More and more local stores are committing to sell bee-friendly plants, untreated by a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids. Pollinators feeding on neonic-contaminated pollen or nectar can experience toxic effects at very low doses, so it’s critical to know how a flowering plant was grown before adding it to your yard.

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Portland Thorns FC EARTH DAY Match with OEC

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 17, 2017.

Celebrate Earth Month with the #1 women’s sports team in the world + support Oregon’s oldest statewide environmental group. Tickets sold at a reduced rate – with ⅓ of your purchase going straight back to OEC. Portland Thorns FC Earth Day Match with OEC SEASON OPENER! Saturday, April 15 @ 12 p.m. TICKETS: Timbers.com/earthday Promo Code: OEC Purchase […]

A Vision for Our Region’s Streets and Transit Network

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 17, 2017.

At The Street Trust (formerly the Bicycle Transportation Alliance), we represent a community vision for a healthy and thriving region where it is safe and easy […]

What I learned on my first Lobby day

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 17, 2017.

Guest blog by JJ Green, member of Oregon Environmental Council’s Emerging Leaders Board JJ joined OEC at a recent lobby day at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem. She shares key take-aways on what it meant for her to show up and talk to elected officials about the policies they’re building. 1)      Every voice has […]

The Roundup for March 17, 2017

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 17, 2017.

Trump Budget Would Slash Environmental Programs, Research — FSEEE Scientific research and environmental protection programs would suffer major cuts under a proposed budget outline released this week ... [read more]

The Freshwater Trust Helps Develop Program to Offset Phosphorus and Improve Habitat in Northern California Wetland

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 17, 2017.

SACRAMENTO, CA — The Freshwater Trust (TFT) is working with the Northern California City

The post The Freshwater Trust Helps Develop Program to Offset Phosphorus and Improve Habitat in Northern California Wetland appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Statement RE: Cuts to EPA & Scientific Research

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 16, 2017.

Oregon must stand strong for environmental & scientific standards that protect our health and our economy President Trump’s proposed budget cuts to the environment and scientific research completely disregard the values we in Oregon have held for generations. “These major cuts to EPA will have real impacts on the health of Oregonians across the state” […]

A New Podcast on A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Mar 16, 2017.

This month, NWEI’s Director of Learning Lacy Cagle had a conversation with our colleagues at Simple Living Works about our newest course book, A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World.  Lacy, who led the development process of A… Read More!

The post A New Podcast on A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Trump Budget Would Slash Environmental Programs, Research

By FSEEE from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 16, 2017.

Scientific research and environmental protection programs would suffer major cuts under a proposed budget outline released this morning by the Trump administration. By percentage, Trump’s ... [read more]

Grant opens doors for The Freshwater Trust to explore low-impact restoration in wilderness

By Haley Walker from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 15, 2017.

PORTLAND, OR — The Freshwater Trust (TFT) is developing a plan for low-impact

The post Grant opens doors for The Freshwater Trust to explore low-impact restoration in wilderness appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

The Street Trust is hiring! Help us find our next Executive Director

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 15, 2017.

The Street Trust is hiring…help us find our next Executive Director! The Street Trust seeks an Executive Director to work closely with a committed Board of Directors, […]

Videos: Why Oregon should ditch dirty diesel

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

  At a hearing before the Oregon state Senate Environment and Natural Resources committee in 2017, Dr. Perry Hystad, Epidemiologist, OSU, describes the emerging science that suggests a link between dementia and people who live near major sources of diesel pollution. Watch the video to hear more. Why is diesel exhaust so toxic? Dr. William […]

Watching Out for Oregon’s Well Water

By Amy Lewin from Oregon Environmental Council. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

Guest blog by Amy Patton, Hydrogeologist in Southern Oregon In the United States, we expect that when we turn on our tap at home, clean, potable water will come out – water that we can drink, cook with, and bathe in without consequence.  This is mostly a reasonable expectation – if you are supplied by […]

Video – The Next Generation of Freshwater Conservation & Restoration

By Mary Beth Leavens from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

  For the employees of The Freshwater Trust, restoring rivers is more than

The post Video – The Next Generation of Freshwater Conservation & Restoration appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Fuel Economy Standards Are Essential to Our Health, Environment and Economy

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

Why rolling back fuel economy standards would be a huge step backward for the U.S., according to President and CEO Mark Tercek.

Have a Pint, Change the World: Support NWEI at Oregon Public House!

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

This season, we’re excited to be one of the non-profit organizations receiving donations from Oregon Public House! Since they opened in 2013, they’ve donated $195,292 to diffierent local non-profit organizations focusing on social justice, community and the environment. Currently we are… Read More!

The post Have a Pint, Change the World: Support NWEI at Oregon Public House! appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Podcast: The first B Corp grocer

By Joe Whitworth from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Mar 13, 2017.

When New Seasons Market opened their first store on the outskirts of Portland,

OIL TRAIN BILLS GAIN STEAM: PRESS BRIEFING & HEARING MONDAY, 3/13

By Liz Terhaar from Columbia Riverkeeper. Published on Mar 13, 2017.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 13, 2017 Gorge Leaders, Public Health Advocates, Fishers and Conservationists Join Legislators to Support Oil Train Safety Legislation WHAT:     Legislators, elected leaders from the Columbia River Gorge, physicians, and fishers will join conservation groups on Monday to hold a press briefing in support of strong legislation to bolster Oregon’s rules for oil [...]

Double Your Gift!

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Mar 10, 2017.

Give in March and you'll double your impact. Go Continue reading

The Roundup for March 10, 2017

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 10, 2017.

Federal Land Good for Local Economies—FSEEE The question of whether states should be given management responsibilities for federal lands raises impassioned arguments over the best ... [read more]

Why the Paris Agreement is in the U.S.’s Best Interest

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Mar 10, 2017.

President and CEO Mark Tercek discusses why it is important for the U.S. to remain in the Paris Agreement and uphold its emissions reduction pledge.

Reading the Tea Leaves

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

With Trump agriculture secretary nominee Sonny Perdue still awaiting a confirmation hearing, which has not been scheduled because the dog appears to have eaten Perdue’s ... [read more]

Changemaker Interview: Miguel Arellano on Living Simply & Finding a Different Way

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

NWEI’s newest course book, A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World, features interviews with inspiring changemakers who have found their own path in living a simple, values-driven life. This week we share an excerpt of our interview with Miguel… Read More!

The post Changemaker Interview: Miguel Arellano on Living Simply & Finding a Different Way appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Nevada Rancher Hage Loses in Court

By FSEEE from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 08, 2017.

A Nevada ranching family that battled federal land managers for decades must remove its cattle from public lands and pay $587,294 in fines for “repeated ... [read more]

The Zombie Westside Bypass Marries Godzilla

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Mar 07, 2017.

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Mary Kyle McCurdy
Tue, 03/07/2017 - 9:45am

A new bill has been proposed to create a toll based highway, cutting north/south across Washington and Clackamas County.  

read more

Women Bike February Recap

By Elizabeth Cabral from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 06, 2017.

This February, we celebrated love and friendship month. We had a fun happy hour with gals at 10 Barrel Brewing and got to know ladies who live and […]

Women Bike: A Guide to Biking in the Rain

By Karla Ibarra from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 06, 2017.

#WinterIsHere. You know what that means—cold wet rides, where it rains practically everyday and you bike everywhere. Biking in the rain. What a terrible, horrible idea…but it doesn’t […]

Living the Dream: Collecting Seed at Crater Lake

By Anna Ramthun from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Mar 06, 2017.

In 2016, IAE was thrilled to begin working on a new seed collection project at one of the most beautiful places in the Pacific Northwest: Crater Lake National Park in southeastern The pretty, pink flowers of Shasta buckwheat, one of many small forbs adapted to survive in the sterile pumice desert and one of our […]

Watch Shane Anderson’s preview for his latest film, A River’s Last Chance.

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Mar 03, 2017.

The Eel River is arguably the best opportunity for wild fish recovery on the entire west coast. Its resilient population of fish has weathered decades of abusive logging practices, catastrophic flood, and a hydropower dam that siphons water out of basin. Today the Eel’s remaining wild fish compete for water with the region’s underground cannabis … Continue reading Watch Shane Anderson’s preview for his latest film, A River’s Last Chance.

Now is the time for Comprehensive Reform

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Mar 03, 2017.

by Hilary Shohoney— Pacific Rivers has long been a vocal advocate for comprehensive reform of the Oregon Forest Practices Act (OFPA), the rules that govern forestry on private forestlands. In 2015 we produced a 30-minute film on the topic that has reached thousands of Oregonians and generated a barrage of comments that were sent to … Continue reading Now is the time for Comprehensive Reform

Same Bill New Name: Steelhead Sanctuary Bill Reintroduced

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Mar 03, 2017.

by Christafien Dixon — What was originally named the Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Act has been reintroduced by Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and Congressman Peter DeFazio under a new name. To honor Frank Moore’s wife and her conservation contributions the bill was renamed the Frank and Jeannie Moore Wild Steelhead Special Management … Continue reading Same Bill New Name: Steelhead Sanctuary Bill Reintroduced

Coalition Defends Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Mar 03, 2017.

Ashland, Oregon-Late last Friday, local and partner conservation groups intervened in two lawsuits to protect the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument from challenges brought by timber interests. The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is one of the most biodiverse places in North America.

Meet Active Transportation Keynote Speakers

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Mar 02, 2017.

The 2017 Oregon Active Transportation Summit is coming up on March 20th and 21st at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. This two-day event includes inspiring […]

An Interview with Journey Author Beckie Elgin

By jonathan from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Mar 02, 2017.

The story of Oregon's most famous wolf OR-7 (aka Journey) continues to be one of the most inspiring wildlife stories in Oregon's history. To capture this incredible tale, Southern Oregon author Beckie Elgin recently published a book with Oregon Wild business supporter Inkwater Press entitled Journey: The Amazing Story of OR-7, the Oregon Wolf that Made History.

Traveling over 4,000 miles in search of a mate and capturing the excitement of wildlife lovers across the globe, Journey's story is certainly one that's worth capturing. Beckie does it beautifully in her new book and shared some of her thoughts on the book in a recent interview.

What was your motivation to write Journey: The Amazing Story of OR-7, the Oregon Wolf that Made History?

I have great respect for the natural world and believe wolves are an essential part of it. Throughout history wolves have been a scapegoat for some people’s fears and resentments, and this has resulted in an unreasonable stereotype and treatment of these animals. In writing about Journey I wanted to add my part to the legacy of literature that strives to dispel myths and present facts about wolves, with the hope that this might help forge a healthier relationship between humans and wolves. 

What's your background with wolves? Have you had any personal experiences?

I had the good fortunate of growing up in a zoo and working with wolves there. While I understand the controversy surrounding zoos, by spending years in one I was able to see the great effort made by zoo people to provide the best facilities and care for their animals. And I appreciate the tremendous progress these places have made over the years, including their success in preserving rare species. When I was young I was given the job of taming a pair of three month-old wolf pups that had never been handled before. That summer I spent all of my time with them until finally, the pups accepted me and allowed me to handle them and take them on walks. By becoming comfortable around humans the wolves lived with much less fear in the captive setting.  

Your book is geared towards kids but it's quite accessible for adults - that's not an easy line to balance. What went into that thought process?

My thoughts were that if I wrote a book for a middle-grade audience I would reach people both younger and older. This has proven to be the case. I’ve had tons of feedback from adults who say they are enjoying the book and learning from it. And I have heard from people who are reading Journey to their younger kids so they can enjoy the book together. Besides, it’s fun to write for a youthful audience. I felt a greater sense of freedom and this created the sections through the point of view of Journey, which many readers say are their favorite parts. 

What do you see as the educational value of your book? How do you think teachers can use it?

The book teaches not only about Journey and his travels, but also about wolves in general.  Readers learn of the history of wolves in our country, what they eat and how they interact with each other, how biologists study wolves and of the issues with livestock. I’ve presented the information in an objective manner, hoping the book will garner classroom discussions about our role in the environment. For example, how much should we intervene in the lives of wild wolves? And what are the solutions to the livestock-predator issues? The book is richly illustrated with photos and maps, which is nice for visual learners. There are in-depth source notes, a bibliography and glossary. We are completing a Teacher’s Guide for Journey that will supplement the educational value of the book. Watch for it on http://journeyor7.com and on my website http://wolvesandwriting.com. Another benefit of writing for the middle-grade audience is that it gets me around kids. I’m doing school and library talks and enjoying every minute of it!

What do you see as Journey's impact on the future of wolf recovery in Oregon?

OR-7 began a veritable procession of wolves to Southern Oregon and Northern California. Of course, another wolf would have eventually done the same thing, but he was the first one that we know of so his impact will never be surpassed. Journey and those that followed him are doing their part to recreate a truly natural wilderness in this area, one that has not existed for over sixty years. 

How has your view of wolves and wolf recovery changed during the process of writing this book?

Along with this book I also write articles on wolves for magazines and newspapers and keep a blog that highlights news on wolves. In doing this I’ve come to realize the deep dedication of people involved in wolf recovery, including those at Oregon Wild. Despite the challenges we face, I believe that the strength and wisdom of these groups and individuals will succeed in the long run in the effort to preserve wolves. In a large sense, we already have. My view of wolves hasn’t changed much. I still consider them enthralling and intelligent animals, struggling to exist in a world that is all too inhabited by people and their ways. Yet, they carry on and are returning to native habitats not only in Oregon and California, but in areas across the globe where they haven’t lived for many, many years. They’re survivors and deserve what help we can give them, not only for their sake, but also for the essential role they play in a healthy environment

 

Beckie will be reading her book on April 3rd at 7:00pm at:

Annie Bloom's Bookstore
7834 SW Capitol Highway
Portland, OR 97219

Click here to purchase* your copy of Journey: The Amazing Story of OR-7, the Oregon Wolf that Made History.

*A portion of the proceeds of Beckie's book will support Oregon Wild's wolf recovery efforts!

Photo Credits: 
Photos by Inkwater Press

A Better Way to Meet America’s Needs: Invest in Nature

By Glenn Prickett from Conservancy Talk. Published on Mar 02, 2017.

Media reports this week indicate that the Trump administration is considering substantial funding cuts in federal environmental and natural resource programs. Reportedly, these and other budget cuts are intended to offset increases in funding for national security. While all government functions should be scrutinized for waste and inefficiency, deep cuts in environmental programs that protect […]

Oregonians Applaud Reintroduction of Frank and Jeanne Moore Wild Steelhead Bill

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Mar 02, 2017.

Legislation would honor legendary couple and protect clean water, the economy, and wildlife Contact: Oakley Brooks, 503-307-3927, obrooks@wildsalmoncenter.org Hilary Shohoney, 503-228-3555 X 207, hilary@pacificrivers.org For Immediate Release Portland, OR (March 2, 2017)—Today, Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and Congressman Peter DeFazio reintroduced a bill that would protect roughly 100,000 acres in Douglas County, … Continue reading Oregonians Applaud Reintroduction of Frank and Jeanne Moore Wild Steelhead Bill

Paving the Path for Peer Outreach

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Mar 01, 2017.

I am an Oregon State University student who is a senior majoring in Environmental Economics and Policy, and I have been volunteering as the first student board member of the Greenbelt Land Trust since last August. I’ve found that Greenbelt Land Trust (GLT) is not commonly known among students at OSU, including the environmentally-knowledgeable ones. I want to help spread awareness of GLT’s mission and highlight the value of conservation in our community. I think that some of Corvallis’s appeal to residents is due to the close proximity to nature and multi-use trails, to which much credit is owed to GLT, who has done valuable work Read More

Landmark Bill Seeks Modernization of Oregon’s Forest Practices Act

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Mar 01, 2017.

February 28, 2017 — Salem, Ore. – Today, Representative Paul Holvey (D-Eugene) introduced HB 3226 to modernize Oregon’s Forest Practices Act (OFPA) in order to reverse decades of catastrophic damages to the State’s waters, fish, wildlife and soils from clearcutting and other industrial logging practices. The proposed legislation would make the OFPA consistent with best … Continue reading Landmark Bill Seeks Modernization of Oregon’s Forest Practices Act

Federal Land Good for Local Economies

By FSEEE from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Mar 01, 2017.

The question of  whether states should be given management responsibilities for federal lands raises impassioned arguments over the best use of wide swaths of the American West. ... [read more]

Backyard Habitat Certification Program Expands to New Clackamas County Cities

By aberman from News. Published on Mar 01, 2017.

Thanks in large part to support from the Clackamas Soil & Water Conservation District and Metro regional government, new areas of Clackamas County are now able to participate in this popular program. Beginning in March, properties (under one acre) in Milwaukie, West Linn, and the Oak Grove and Jennings Lodge area can receive our full suite of program services.

Affordable housing is a challenge, but sprawl is not the answer

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

20170228
Alyson Marchi-Young
Tue, 02/28/2017 - 5:50pm

read more

2017 Oregon State of Agriculture Industry Report

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

20170228
Greg Holmes
Tue, 02/28/2017 - 5:40pm

Agriculture continues to be one of Oregon's leading industries, providing over $50 billion in sales of food, fiber, and agricultural products, and providing over 325,000 full and part-time jobs.

read more

Register Now for Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute: June 18-23

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

Cottonwood Canyon Summer Institute is a week long field study course at Cottonwood Canyon State Park.

Cold Chilly Morning for Amphibians

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

On Sunday morning, I woke up to rain flooding the streets in my neighborhood.  I packed my vehicle full of chest waders, and I drove south on I-5 where I was bombarded by snow.  By the time 10 volunteers showed up to Hedges Creek wetlands in Tualatin, the precipitation had stopped, but the cold air

The post Cold Chilly Morning for Amphibians appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

A New Film from The Story of Stuff Project: The Story of Microfibers

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

Since the launch of our newest course book, we’ve been looking for new ways to curb consumption and make an impact. Luckily, the Story of Stuff Project (who joined us for our annual EcoChallenge in 2016) is releasing a new movie this week on… Read More!

The post A New Film from The Story of Stuff Project: The Story of Microfibers appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Comment Toolkit: Stop PGE’s Fracked Gas Plans

By gpmonahan from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Feb 27, 2017.

Thank you for helping us transition to 100% clean renewable energy by stopping  Portland General Electric’s plans to build two new gas-fired power plants in Boardman, OR. Clicking on the links below will bring up a .pdf document in your web browser which you can either print or download. Comment cards to submit to the […]

Creating Watersheds of the Future

By Danielle from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Feb 27, 2017.

No matter where you are, you’re in a watershed. Like neighborhoods, they vary

The post Creating Watersheds of the Future appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

February Hells Bells

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Feb 24, 2017.

See the latest newsletter here!

Solar Eclipse 2017 News

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Feb 24, 2017.

Become a Foundation Member today and you could have the winning bid on a campsite for the weekend of the 2017 Solar Eclipse!

2016 Accomplishments

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Feb 24, 2017.

Thank you to our members and supporters for making 2016 a success, despite the many challenges the year brought. Linked below are just some of the accomplishments we are proud to share with you. 2016 Accomplishments Letter Online Thank you again for caring about the Greater Hells Canyon Region!

The Roundup for February 24, 2017

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Feb 24, 2017.

Happy birthday! This past week, the Daniel Boone National Forest in Kentucky (originally named the Cumberland) celebrates 80 years and the Bighorn National Forest in ... [read more]

Take Action

By Kim Leval from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Feb 23, 2017.

Last month our suggested actions included opposing the confirmations of two nominees of concern to our work and priorities: Scott Pruitt for head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Sonny Perdue head of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Creating greener highways + more tree news: February Treemail

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Feb 23, 2017.

This month we celebrate the return of the Living Highways program; get to know our good partners the Port of Portland; acknowledge our amazing community support; and share ways to get more involved. Read all about it in February 2017 Treemail.

A Touch of Appreciation: Lessons Learned from Trees

By Jay Davis from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Feb 23, 2017.

I have a deep appreciation for trees. It’s the reason why I chose to work for Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. I can easily  more...

Oregon breweries make an investment in the future of freshwater

By Andy Meeks from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Feb 22, 2017.

Oregon’s pioneering spirit captured the beer industry back in the 1980’s and has

The post Oregon breweries make an investment in the future of freshwater appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

2017 Oregon Active Transportation Mobile Workshop Registration Now Open!

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Feb 21, 2017.

Back again for 2017…we are proud to offer Oregon Active Transportation Summit Mobile Workshops and evening PechaKucha event; both are added benefits to Summit registration and free, open-to-the-public […]

Why is A Different Way So Important Right Now?

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Feb 21, 2017.

We just launched A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World and over 200 people are off and running with the new course, organizing discussions in your communities and coming together to create change. This new course book shares insights on how… Read More!

The post Why is A Different Way So Important Right Now? appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

The Roundup for February 17, 2017

By Jennifer Fairbrother from Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. Published on Feb 17, 2017.

Take Note… Congress is in recess for the President’s day holiday. Most representatives will be hosting town hall meetings during this time. We urge you to ... [read more]

SB 199: Extended Producer Responsibility for Household Hazardous Waste

By Adrienne Welsh from . Published on Feb 17, 2017.

On Thursday February 16, 2017, the Oregon Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources held an informational meeting on SB 199 followed by an initial hearing. This is the first step for this piece of legislation, and if passed, will implement an extended producer responsibility program for household hazardous waste products in the state. Recycling […]

Bridging the Gap: Strengthening Community Conservation in Canada and Africa

By Claire Hutton from Conservancy Talk. Published on Feb 17, 2017.

But with different cultures, different histories, different landscapes, different threats, different socio-political drivers, what commonalities could there possibly be? More than you may think.

2017 Legislative Testimony HB 2144 Addressing Nonconforming Uses

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Feb 16, 2017.

20170216
Meriel Darzen
Thu, 02/16/2017 - 5:10pm

Chair Clem and members of the Committee:

Thank you for the opportunity to provide testimony on HB 2144, a bill addressing nonconforming uses. 1000 Friends of Oregon is a nonprofit, membership organization that works with Oregonians to support livable urban and rural communities; protect family farms, forests and natural areas; and provide transportation and housing choice.

read more

Foundation Supports Parks Department Budget proposal

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Feb 16, 2017.

Our Executive Director, Seth Miller, recently testified to the Joint Ways & Means Committee reviewing the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department budget.  The Department is asking for a much needed increase in field staffing to deal with the explosive growth in usage of the State Parks system (more than 54 million visits last year!), and […]

Electricity From Clean Renewable Energy Sources

By gpmonahan from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Feb 16, 2017.

Portland General Electric (PGE) wants to build 2 new gas fired electrical power plants next door to the Boardman Coal Plant. If allowed to go forward these plants would lock us into another 40 years of emissions from fracked gas and destroy our chance to move to a clean energy future.   Earlier this year […]

Gone But Not Forgotten - OR4 in NYC

By guest from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Feb 16, 2017.

By Ester Curini

I am an Italian artist. I live and work in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Standing Tall by Ester Curini

I had never seen a real life wolf in my life until I visited the Wolf Conservation Center in North Salem, NY, four years ago. Seeing wolves up close and listening to their howls has been a life-changing experience for me. I decided to have an exhibition just about wolves, one of the most misunderstood and persecuted animal of all time.

Since my first visit in a cold winter day in 2012, I have traveled to the WCC regularly for the past four years to become acquainted with the wolves and take pictures I use as a reference for my portraits. It takes up to three months to complete a painting.
 
There are moments in life so striking that when you think about them you remember exactly what time it was, what were the weather conditions, or what kind of light came through the window. 

One of those moments happened when I came across Rob Klavins' blog post “A Eulogy for OR-4”.

A human being was saying goodbye to a wolf, a wild one in a way so honest and sensitive that it broke my heart. “He was a good father”.

I envisioned the scene, as if I was in the helicopter myself…of the 10-year old OR-4, his limping mate and their two pups running for their lives. In that exact moment, I decided that OR-4 had to be part of my pack of wolf paintings with the role he had in life as an Alpha wolf.

In the eyes, I painted a vague human figure because it is up to us to find a way to coexist with these magnificent animals. We need to preserve and protect them in a compassionate way. 

I am Essential by Ester Curini

The painting, entitled “I Was Wild. They Named Me OR-4” will be included with other works in an upcoming exhibit called “Endangered” in New York City.

March 2 – April 1
Bernarducci Meisel Gallery
37W 57th Street, New York, NY

My aim is to connect the urban population with nature through my painting, and most importantly to raise awareness about their importance in our ecosystem.

The center of my work is capturing the unique energy, essence and the spirit of each creature I paint. Isolating the figures on a seamless background is my way to concentrate only on the essential that matters to me.
 
The Wolf Conservation Center, located in South Salem, NY, is private not-for-profit organization founded in 1999 by Helene Grimaud. Their valuable mission is to promote wolf conservation by teaching about wolves how they are essential in our ecosystem. You can find out more at nywolf.org

We welcome a new face!

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Feb 15, 2017.

Nakisha Nathan joins us as our new Organizer. In her new role, she will start off with legislative organizing the clean energy jobs bills, and other climate work. Nakisha’s love for nature and commitment to Environmental Justice stem from spending her formative years living in Panama, Canada, Texas and throughout the United States. A few […]

Journey to Tikopia: Conservation Challenges in Remote Melanesia

By Rick Hamilton from Conservancy Talk. Published on Feb 15, 2017.

A visit to remote and spectacular locations throughout Melanisia, home to incredibly diverse coral reefs, reveals the far-flung impacts of the Anthropocene.

ONDA to testify in defense of public lands in Salem House hearing Thursday

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Feb 14, 2017.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association will testify Thursday, Feb. 16, in Salem against a short-sighted bill aimed at divesting Americans and Oregonians of our public lands.

Loving your bike: taking care of your bike

By Karla Ibarra from The Street Trust. Published on Feb 14, 2017.

Every bike deserves some tender loving care to keep it in shape and enjoy a smooth ride. During the cold, rainy months it is especially important to keep […]

2017 Live the Revolution Recap

By Kate Walker from The Street Trust. Published on Feb 14, 2017.

How fun was that?! We held another great evening of celebratory #bikelove, shared among 325 friends on Friday, February 10th at Live the Revolution—The Street Trust’s annual […]

Video – Snake River Stewardship Project

By Brian Kelley from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Feb 10, 2017.

  What defines a working river? Is it the number of birds feeding

The post Video – Snake River Stewardship Project appeared first on The Freshwater Trust.

Podcast: TreePeople’s Deborah Weinstein-Bloome

By Joe Whitworth from The Freshwater Trust. Published on Feb 10, 2017.

LA has never been known as a “green” city. That’s changing. Water conservation

NWEI’s Newest Course Book Is Here!

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Feb 09, 2017.

NW Earth Institute’s newest course book is here! We are very excited to announce the launch of A Different Way: Living Simply in a Complex World, which explores practical ways to simplify your life and reduce your impact, while also reconnecting… Read More!

The post NWEI’s Newest Course Book Is Here! appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

IAE Volunteer Expedition to Oregon’s Illinois Valley

By Tom Kaye from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Feb 08, 2017.

Join us for a multi-day service and learning trip to southern Oregon’s serpentine country to monitor populations of the endangered Cook‘s desert-parsley Location: Southern Oregon’s Illinois Valley, Oregon Date: May 1st-May 5th, 2017 (1-Week) Cost: $150 to cover the costs of lodging and meals Dates: 5/1-5/5/17 (Register by 4/3/17) Departure: from Corvallis 8:30 am on 5/1, return by 7:00 pm on 5/5 […]

We Applaud Proposed Conservative Case for Addressing Climate Change

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Feb 08, 2017.

President and CEO Mark Tercek on why a proposed plan for carbon dividends may be just the step we need to make real progress on climate.

Public Outcry Defeats Lands Privatization Bill

By Alexander from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Feb 07, 2017.

Public lands advocates claimed a crucial win last week! An outpouring of citizen opposition forced one of the nation’s most prominent public lands privatization boosters to withdraw support for his own bill calling for the sale of over 3 million acres of public lands across the west.The victory was an incredible example of people from across the country uniting in a common cause and making their voices heard to protect public lands.

When Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) introduced The Disposal of Excess Federal Lands Act (H.R.621), intense opposition sprang up from a broad coalition of public lands advocates, conservationists, hunters, anglers, and other elected officials. Last week also saw massive pro-public lands rallies in Montana and New Mexico. In addition to rallies, thousands contacted their elected officials, then reached out to get support from recreation and hunting businesses.

Of the 3.3 million acres proposed to be sold, over 70,000 acres were in Oregon. The specific land to be sold could not be identified on a map, as the bill was based on a 20 year old survey that only provided acreage numbers by county and some descriptions. Since the bill’s sponsor has pulled his support, these specific lands are safe for now; however, this legislation was a shot across the bow, demonstrating the growing influence of the “anti-Parks caucus” in Congress.

In their first day back in Congress this year, House Republicans paved the way for the Chaffetz bill and future land give-aways by officially designating the value of all public lands to be $0. This move allows House members to bypass accounting rules that require an analysis of the financial losses associated with disposing of publically owned land, which makes it easier to sell off vast swaths of the American west.

Proposals like the Chaffetz bill to sell off public lands to private interests are perhaps the most direct threat posed to public ownership, but they are not the only threat. Armed standoffs have given this movement national attention and in recent years, there has been a wave of legislative proposals in DC and state capitals to transfer the ownership of federal land to state governments. The idea of transferring land to the states was once a fringe idea rejected by the mainstream left and right; however, this past summer the idea was officially endorsed by the GOP platform and continues to receive support from industry-friendly members of Congress.

At first, transferring land to the states may seem benign, so why are corporate interests and anti-government groups working together to build the land transfer movement? These groups seek land transfers because they know that states don’t have the regulatory or financial capacity to adequately manage large amounts of land in the west, and therefore they are often forced to privatize. Put simply, eliminating federal ownership of these landscapes​ will ​inevitably lead to less public access and the increased exploitation of natural resources, which is attractive to states like Utah where federal environmental regulations are seen as cumbersome and unfriendly to development.

Despite these growing threats, polls show strong support for public lands, partially due to the billions of dollars and millions of jobs that come from the recreation economy.​ Oregon Wild has fought against privatization efforts for many years, and recently we hired an organizer to help grow the pro-public lands movement in our state. This coming year, we will need advocates of the planet like you to stand up and get loud to ensure public lands stay in public hands.

 

January 2017 Hells Bells

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Feb 07, 2017.

Hello, all!  Please find our January Hells Bells here!

Another Way to Be

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Feb 07, 2017.

We all deal with the wilderness differently. For some, it’s a frightening thing, to be so far from streets and buildings and cell service,  more...

Volunteers Needed for Habitat Restoration

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Feb 07, 2017.

Volunteers can directly improve water quality with their own hands by engaging in these native plantings events. For more information, contact Mike at mike@tualatinriverkeepers.org. November 12, 2016 & February 25, 2017: Join us as we plant trees and shrubs at Sherwood’s Woodhaven Park from 9am to 12pm. We tend to average 1,000 plants in the […]

Responses to Willamette Week article about bottle bill deposit increase

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Feb 07, 2017.

In the February 1st edition of the Willamette Weekly, an article titled “Corporate Lobbyists Turned Oregon’s Iconic Bottle Bill Into a Sweet Payday For Their Clients” discussed the financial impact of the bottle bill increase from 5 cents to 10 cents on April 1st. In the article, it was mentioned that unclaimed deposits result in […]

OCN ANNOUNCES THE 2017 PRIORITIES FOR A HEALTHY OREGON

By April Christenson from . Published on Feb 06, 2017.

The Oregon Conservation Network – a coalition of environmental advocates from across Oregon coordinated by the Oregon League of Conservation Voters – has announced their 2017 Priorities for a Healthy ...

The post OCN ANNOUNCES THE 2017 PRIORITIES FOR A HEALTHY OREGON appeared first on .

Changemaker Interview: Advanced Micro Devices Makes Big Impact with EcoChallenge

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Feb 06, 2017.

NWEI’s Director of Membership and Engagement, Liz Zavodsky, sat down with Kate Barber, the Go Green Project Manager for AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) to talk about AMD’s inspiring experience participating in NWEI’s EcoChallenge.  During the EcoChalleng over 300 AMD employee team members… Read More!

The post Changemaker Interview: Advanced Micro Devices Makes Big Impact with EcoChallenge appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Clackamas County Master Recycler Program Accepting Applications

By Adrienne Welsh from . Published on Feb 05, 2017.

Curious about how recycling works? Learn from the experts. Share what you know.    The Clackamas County Master Recycler program is now accepting applications for their spring course beginning on March 29th. Registration is open now through March 8th.   Make a difference. Become a Master Recycler this spring. www.masterrecycler.org.

Be an Agent of Change: Join NWEI Founders for a Training Beginning 2/27

By Deborah McNamara from Northwest Earth Institute. Published on Feb 02, 2017.

For those of you in the Portland area, NWEI founders Dick and Jeanne Roy and the Center for Earth Leadership invite you to consider joining a five-session leadership training beginning February 27th. As Dick and Jeanne note, the recent presidential election calls us to… Read More!

The post Be an Agent of Change: Join NWEI Founders for a Training Beginning 2/27 appeared first on Northwest Earth Institute.

Tree planting at Herbert Farm

By Peter Moore from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Feb 02, 2017.

On February 1st 2017 a crew from R. Franco Restoration planted 7,500 trees and shrubs at Herbert Farm and Natural Area, a City of Corvallis property in Benton County, Oregon. IAE is helping Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, who hold a conservation easement on the property through the Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program, to restore […]

Beaver Events Kick-off This Week

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Feb 01, 2017.

This week marks the beginning of a whirlwind year of events all about Oregon’s beloved beaver.             Frances Backhouse Reading February 8, 7:00-8:00 pm Broadway Books, Portland The Wetlands Conservancy welcomes Canadian author Frances Backhouse who will do a reading of her book Once They Were Hats: In Search of

The post Beaver Events Kick-off This Week appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Solar to Go – Powering a Home Office Away from Home

By Lisa Logie from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

More companies are encouraging their employees to work from home a day a week or more to increase staff productivity, save space, and improve work-life balance (we hope), which leads to additional electric power usage at the house during the day. Hence, telecommuting is another argument for installing solar which allows you to take advantage […]

Take Three Actions Today to Protect Community and Environmental Health

By Kim Leval from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Jan 30, 2017.

From our experience, strategically targeted phone calls to your own legislators, including Senators and Representatives in Congress, have a significantly stronger impact than mass emails and petitions. Phone calls take only a few minutes.

Land Use in South Korea

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jan 26, 2017.

20170127
Jenni Denekas
Fri, 01/27/2017 - 2:50pm

A pictorial tour

Our volunteer and development assistant Jenni Denekas traveled to South Korea last month. Oregon is not the only place with effective land use policies. Check out Jenni's land use tour of South Korea and learn more about how other regions manage their lands to create livable communities, protect natural and working landscapes, and honor their history.

LULIs Tour the Southwest Corridor

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Jan 26, 2017.

20170127
Andrew Riley
Wed, 01/27/2016 - 12:30pm

February is upon us, and that means our 2016-17 Land Use Leadership Initiative (LULI) program is at its halfway point!

read more

Finding Frogs and Salamanders: Amphibian Monitoring 2017

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Jan 26, 2017.

January 21st kicked off our 2017 Amphibian Monitoring trainings in partnership with Metro, Clean Water Services and Tualatin Hills Parks & Rec. Over the next two months, citizen science volunteers will be looking for Northern red-legged Frog, Northwestern salamander, Pacific chorus frog and long-toed salamander egg masses in their local wetlands. Presence of amphibians in

The post Finding Frogs and Salamanders: Amphibian Monitoring 2017 appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Developing a Rapid Response Team

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Jan 26, 2017.

In response to the Trump administration’s anti-environment, anti-justice agenda – Oregon Sierra Club is creating a state-based Rapid Response Team. The Rapid Response Team is a powerful network of grassroots volunteers who want to take immediate and regular action to defend Oregon’s progress and values. By uniting and raising our voices, we will defend justice and equity in our communities; ensure […]

Groups to Defend Portland's Historic Fossil Fuel Ordinance from Industry Attack

By aberman from News. Published on Jan 26, 2017.

Today Columbia Riverkeeper, Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility, Audubon Society of Portland, and the Center for Sustainable Economy filed a motion to intervene in an industry-backed lawsuit challenging Portland’s historic fossil fuel ordinance. Last year the City of Portland unanimously passed a first-in-the-country ban on new bulk fossil fuel storage facilities that exceed two million gallons; the ordinance also forbids existing terminals from expanding.

Getting ready for the 2017 session of the Oregon Legislature

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Jan 25, 2017.

In some ways, it feels like we just recessed from the 2016 legislative session, in which we had several real victories, like passing the historic Clean Electricity Coal Transition bill. But we’re already headed back to Salem next week for the 2017 session, which is going to be a tough one on many fronts (see […]

Oregon Forestry Agency Suppresses Science

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jan 25, 2017.

  It is all of our duty to hold our elected leaders accountable for actions that put the health of our communities at risk. Beyond Toxics has been working for 4 years to bring sound scientific reporting and analysis of forestry pesticide applications into the decision-making processes at our state capitol. Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB)... Read more »

The post Oregon Forestry Agency Suppresses Science appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

On the March

By chandra from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Jan 24, 2017.

From Paris to L.A. to Antarctica - all across the country and the world - women and advocates for human rights stood together this past Saturday to demand continued progress toward human equity, social justice, and reproductive health.

In Oregon, reports of “the largest rally/protest/march ever seen in XX town” reverberated from the coast to the Idaho border. Many of Oregon Wild’s staff and loved ones participated in these gatherings. What they experienced was remarkable and uplifting - not only for the values espoused by March organizers - but for the common cause of protecting our planet as well. 

When I made my signs for the March on Friday evening at a friend’s house in Silver Spring, Maryland (after scrounging the paper options at the local craft store, which was completely out of poster board, markers, and most other make-shift sign-making materials!) I knew I was going with one of the themes suggested by Great Old Broads for Wilderness. I went with “Wild Women for Public Lands” and “None of This Matters if We Destroy Our Home,” along with “Empowered Women Empower Women.” 

My friend went with “There is NO Planet B!” I wasn’t sure I’d see other environmentally-themed posters. But in the sea of half a million people near the National Mall I knew I was not alone in valuing our planet and nature’s rights alongside women’s, minorities’, LGBTQ, and immigrants’. At one point, a chant even broke out in my area: “Climate Change is Real! Climate Change is Real!” (Especially poignant as the new White House scrubbed its website of any reference to this very real issue that morning.)


 
March in Joseph, OR

Other staff noticed the same themes at marches in Portland, Eugene, Bend, and Joseph. It is heartening to see that Oregonians are elevating the importance of our public lands, our wild spaces, our very planet alongside the critically important human and social justice rights highlighted in the Women’s Marches around the globe. We’ve noticed this since the election - in the number of folks interested in our Wild Ones programs and other events, and in the general increase in advocacy from people who have, by their own admission, been sitting on the sidelines. Our tables at the events that ended the Eugene and Bend marches had overwhelming support and interest in getting more involved in Oregon Wild’s work. We’re excited and exhilarated by this!

While an increase in activism - for so many important issues - is a wonderful outcome of this election season and the Women’s March movement, perhaps the most positive thing to come from these marches is a sense of community. Of people coming together to fight injustice - whether directed towards their neighbors who might be from another country, their sisters, or to the air we all breathe. In Wallowa County in NE Oregon, for example, in a town of about 1,000 people 310 people marched this past Saturday. Rob, our staff resident of this rural community, reported that old-time Wallowa County folks said unequivocally that they'd never seen anything like that before, and he noted that one of the more moving things was seeing a community that has often been bullied and oppressed find each other and find their voice. Let’s all work together to make sure this momentum continues.

OLCV’s 20th Annual Celebration for the Environment

By April Christenson from . Published on Jan 24, 2017.

It’s time to celebrate our community, our leaders, our friends, and our environment. Join us for OLCV’s 20th Annual Celebration for the Environment, featuring the Celebration Dinner, an intimate gathering ...

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Join the Clean Green Lobby Machine 2017

By April Christenson from . Published on Jan 24, 2017.

The Clean Green Lobby Machine is back again! On Thursday, March 23rd, the environmental community will come together at the Oregon State Capitol to hold our elected officials accountable and ...

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Addressing Environmental Challenges Today – Core Principles for a Time of Change

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Jan 24, 2017.

Mark Tercek, President and CEO, shares his views on the core principles environmentalists can follow to address environmental challenges today.

Islands of Prosperity

By Peter Moore from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Jan 23, 2017.

Recently IAE hosted the Gold 5 AmeriCorps team, a group of young volunteers devote 9 months to community service. Among other projects they spent two days planting native species to enrich the plant community and enhance habitat for Fender’s blue butterfly at Fir Butte, a Bureau of Land Management site just west of Eugene. Fir […]

State Forester betrays public trust by ignoring sound science

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Jan 23, 2017.

Portland, Ore – In the wake of a shocking Oregon Public Broadcasting story revealing that a Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) report was silenced by Big Timber and Oregon’s State Forester, conservation and citizen groups are calling on Governor Brown to provide the accountability and transparency promised when she took office. In a letter signed … Continue reading State Forester betrays public trust by ignoring sound science

RA and AOR receive DEQ grant for Recycling 101 course update

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Jan 22, 2017.

Recycling Advocates was awarded a grant from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to assist in updating the Recycling 101 online course. RA is proud to be partnering with the Association of Oregon Recyclers (AOR) and the DEQ to strengthen and expand the Recycling 101 class for all Oregonians. Recycling 101 is modeled after the […]

Against Aerial Spraying

By Jason from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Jan 20, 2017.

Oregon Wild is Against Aerial Spraying. 

Oregon wild supports policies and practices that protect and enhance thriving ecosystems that contribute to human and environmental health, and while we fight to advance such policies on the broadest scale possible, usually at a State or Federal level, we endorse people’s right to protect themselves from dangerous industrial practices on a local level as well. 

That is why we are announcing our support for the hard work and good ideas of community groups working to ban aerial spraying in both Lane and Lincoln counties, in addition to our efforts to stop aerial spray at a state wide level. 

 

The term aerial spraying is shorthand for the practice of using a helicopter to spray herbicides on land after it has been clearcut and turned into a “crop”, whether trees or otherwise. This is a major concern for Oregonians whose drinking water comes from forests, which is most of us. It is even more of a concernfor the people of Oregon’s Coast Range and coastal towns, where many of the streams providing peoples’ drinking water originate on the steep headwalls of coastal mountains, often owned and clearcut by corporations and Wall Street investment firms.

 
As Oregon Wild’s Forest and Watershed Campaign Organizer, and a resident of the Coast Range, I spend much of my time in those coastal communities, helping concerned citizens demand reforms to the outdated logging laws that allow the forests above their homes and towns to be clearcut with little to no regard for the impacts that will have on their drinking water. I help them spread their stories of helicopter spray drifting onto their homes, properties and bodies, sometimes making them sick, possibly causing deadly conditions in their pets, always making them afraid to drink their own water. 
Of all of the major problems in need of reform in Oregon’s logging laws; clearcutting, steep slopes logging, no tree buffers on 70% of streams, log exports, tax structures, etc, it is aerial spraying that draws the most ire from the people I meet in rural Oregon. Whether you are concerned about yourself, your pets, your family, your livestock, your property rights, or the health of the surrounding environment, the people I meet every day in rural Oregon agree . . . It is time to ban aerial spraying of herbicides. 

At Oregon Wild, we are working to do that every day. In addition to grassroots organizing, we have worked on ballot initiatives, we work in Salem with elected officials, we attend Board of Forestry meetings and bring our supporters to testify at them, we go to town hall meetings in local communities, and we work to keep our nearly 20,000 supporters updated with ways they can get involved in the fights to protect Oregon’s citizens, waters, and wildlife from such a dangerous practice.

These toxic substances have been seen to drift up to 4 miles! 

 Oregon Wild with the Citizens of Rockaway Beach doing grassroots outreach to Save Short Sands from aerial spray! 

We are committed to this daily work to stop aerial spraying statewide, and to reform the entire outdated Oregon Forest Practices Act, which was written when we still painted houses with lead, and has failed entirely to keep up with modern science. 

However, we can not ignore the fact that Salem remains in the midst of a decades-long dearth of environmental leadership, especially when it comes to the way we log our precious forests. Coordinated efforts, supported by a majority of Oregonians and modern science, to make even the most modest reforms to Oregon’s logging and herbicide laws have been met by lawmakers with attitudes ranging from indifference to near rabid hostility. In 2015, rural Oregonians who asked to be notified in advance of aerial spray happening near their homes were told by Salem lawmakers that this wasn’t an option because they may be “eco-terrorists.” 

What world do these legislators live in that the idea that I should have clean drinking water and breathable air should be considered so radical? 

In Lane and Lincoln counties, citizens are refusing to wait any longer and have begun what they call Community Rights Initiatives to protect themselves and their ecosystems from this harmful practice. If passed by voters in 2017, these laws would stop the practice of aerial spraying any kind of herbicide or pesticide from the sky, protecting human health, clean water, and biodiversity. 

To our supporters who live in Lane and Lincoln Counties, I urge you to look into these initiatives, whose information is linked below, support their efforts in your community, and make sure you know when they will be on your ballot for a vote. And to all of our supporters, rest assured that we continue working to defend all of Oregon from wreckless industrial logging practices, and with your support I know we can do it. 

We look forward to your continued support to enact rules that not only stop aerial spray, but that bring our entire Forest Practices Act up to date, so that Oregon may once again lead the way in environmental protections, and true sustainability. 

CLICK HERE for Lane County Spray Ban information
CLICK HERE for Lincoln County Spray Ban information

Not in one of those counties?
Sign on to our petition demanding statewide reform to Oregon's forest laws  and find other ways to take action by CLICKING HERE! 

 

 

  Jason Gonzales

  Forest & Watershed
  Campaign Organizer,
  Oregon Wild

  541-344-0675

 

ONDA to release its 2017 calendar of stewardship trips

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Jan 19, 2017.

More than 30 trips with the Oregon Natural Desert Association into Oregon’s high desert – from floating the John Day River to counting Greater sage-grouse – will open for registration on Monday, Feb. 13.

Klamath Advocates Go To Court Over Wildlife Mismanagement

By aberman from News. Published on Jan 18, 2017.

Yesterday three conservation groups, Audubon Society of Portland, Oregon Wild and WaterWatch of Oregon filed litigation in federal court against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failure to follow federal law in the creation of the Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex. In 2015, the same groups won a court order to compel the agency to finally produce the long-overdue plan, which is required by law.

We are Hiring! Associate Director

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Jan 18, 2017.

JOB TITLE: ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR REPORTS TO: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE The Wetlands Conservancy is seeking a full-time (40 hours/week) Associate Director to design, implement and oversee systems focused on efficient financial management and human resource management, office and operational management, regulatory compliance and organizational sustainability. Candidates should have a Bachelors degree or higher in public

The post We are Hiring! Associate Director appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Three Lessons Environmentalists Can Learn from Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Mark Tercek from Conservancy Talk. Published on Jan 17, 2017.

President and CEO Mark Tercek shares his thoughts on the lessons environmentalists can learn from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr: being positive, collaborating through common ground and engaging in dialogue.

Hydro Flask provides transportation grant for Ticket2Ride

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Jan 11, 2017.

Ticket2Ride is the Foundation's program to provide students with an in field experiential learning experience.

Frontline Communities Need Air Data

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jan 11, 2017.

All communities need their voices heard and their rightful place in the decisions to strengthen Oregon’s air quality laws. In order to be effective advocates for their own communities and their families’ health, impacted residents need accurate and complete data about toxic pollutants in the Air. The following letter was submitted on Jan. 10 &... Read more »

The post Frontline Communities Need Air Data appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

Unite Against Hate with the One Oregon Coalition

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Jan 11, 2017.

It’s been two months since the election and I’m still reeling. Donald Trump’s victory represents an assault on people of color – undocumented people and  other immigrants in particular. The Southern Poverty Law Center documented over 700 hate crimes committed in the week following the election. The danger for LGBTQ people, people of color, immigrants, […]

2015-16 Monitoring Report (aka, about the trees we planted)

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Jan 10, 2017.

by Jesse Batty, Neighborhood Trees Senior Specialist; ISA Certified Arborist Planting a tree is a relatively simple act. Ensuring that a tree survives the first growing season and the subsequent years thereafter is more difficult. The goal of FOT’s Neighborhood Trees monitoring program is to provide proper tree planting education and after-planting care assistance to new tree owners so […]

Join us for our 2017 annual meeting on January 28th, 1-4pm at the Winona Grange (8340 SW Seneca St, Tualatin OR)

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Jan 10, 2017.

In addition to an update on TRK’s 2016 highlights and success, we’ll screen a short film about the plight of bees and have an in-depth discussion about the role of pesticides in the watershed guided by Sharon Selvaggio from NW Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. We’ll also have a Local Honey Tasting and enjoy light […]

Audubon Society of Portland Statement on the Portland Harbor Superfund Record of Decision

By aberman from News. Published on Jan 06, 2017.

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its Final Record of Decision (ROD) on the Portland Harbor Superfund Site. The Record of Decision formally adopts a Cleanup Plan for Portland Harbor which was listed as a Superfund Site in the year 2000.

Private Sector Biodiversity Commitments Leveraged by CBD COP13

By Colin Herron from Conservancy Talk. Published on Jan 06, 2017.

Biodiversity was high on the agenda in Mexico when the country hosted the 13th Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) last month. The event did much more than confirm existing commitments for biodiversity preservation and foster some exciting new commitments. The process that preceded CBD COP13 placed biodiversity issues […]

Court Halts Logging of Elliott State Forest Tract Sold to Timber Company

By aberman from News. Published on Jan 05, 2017.

A U.S. District Court in Eugene has issued a preliminary ruling preventing Scott Timber from clearcutting a parcel of the Elliott State Forest purchased from the state of Oregon. The court found that the proposed logging of the Benson Ridge parcel by the subsidiary of Roseburg Forest Products would likely harm threatened marbled murrelets, in violation of the federal Endangered Species Act.

It’s cold out there! Arctic-weather tree-care tips

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Jan 05, 2017.

Yep, it’s cold out there! Friends of Trees plants trees that are adapted to our hardiness zone, though cold and icy weather can still take its toll. Here are some tips: 1) Have your trees assessed by an ISA Certified Arborist at the beginning of winter 2) Add an organic mulch like wood chips around […]

Strides to Improve Air Quality and Ban Asbestos

By Anna Suarez from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jan 05, 2017.

Healthy air should be a basic right, but all over the world, people face exposure to toxins that remain unregulated and dangerous. It’s important that the public becomes more educated about these toxins, both in the natural environment and those hidden in consumer products or construction materials within our own homes. With better awareness and... Read more »

The post Strides to Improve Air Quality and Ban Asbestos appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

Trip Leader Training

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Jan 05, 2017.

Trip Leader Training Classroom Session Saturday, February 18, 2017 Tualatin Heritage Center 10am to 3pm Will cover the volunteer job positions plus TRK history and current programs descriptions, fleet/equipment review, and a riverside “mock” paddle trip training Pool Training Session Saturday, March 11, 2017 Tualatin Aquatic Center at Tualatin High School 9am – noon Review […]

Journey: One Tale, Two Books

By marielle from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Jan 04, 2017.

Journey Book Cover (courtesy of Beckie Elgin)

The world's most famous wolf has made it to another historic destination: literature. His story of dispersal from Northeast Oregon to find a mate and traveling over 3,000 miles across the Cascades and into California and back inspired young and old across the globe, including two authors from Oregon and California. You can now bring the story of OR-7 (Journey) into your home with the following beautiful publications.

Journey:
The Amazing Story of OR-7, the Oregon Wolf that Made History
By Beckie Elgin

About the book courtesy of Inkwater Press

Join the adventures of the famous wolf OR-7, also known as Journey, as he trots across the landscape of the Pacific Northwest into territories that have not seen his kind for nearly a century. Follow this remarkable animal as he searches for, and finally finds, what he was seeking during his three-year, 4,000-mile trek. Along the way, you’ll discover fascinating facts about wolves and meet the humans that had a role in Journey’s quest. Enjoy the many photographs, maps, and sketches that help tell the tale of this courageous wolf. Journey: The Amazing Story of OR-7, the Oregon Wolf that Made History was created for middle-grade readers but will be appreciated by everyone with an interest in wolves and a desire to better understand these complex and essential canines.

From Oregon Wild's Rob Klavins

Journey's story is one of redemption - for us and for wolves...No matter your age, you'll enjoy this book immensely.

Purchase Journey: The Amazing Story of OR-7 

by Beckie Elgin

(A portion of proceeds support Oregon Wild's wildlife efforts!)

 


Journey
Based on the True Story of OR7, the Most Famous Wolf in the West
By Emma Bland Smith; Robin James (illustrator)

Inside illustration of

About the book courtesy of Sasquatch Books

This beautiful picture book follows the journey of a young gray wolf who garnered nationwide attention when he became the first wild wolf in California in almost a century. Using facts recorded by Fish & Wildlife scientists, author Emma Bland Smith imagines the wolf’s experiences in close detail as he makes an epic 2,000-mile trek over three years time. The wolf’s story is interwoven with the perspective of a young girl who follows his trek through the media. As she learns more about wolves and their relationships with humans, she becomes determined to find a way to keep him safe by making him a wolf that is too famous to harm.

Emma Bland Smith is a librarian and writer living with her family in San Francisco. This is her first book for children. She has written a nonfiction book for adults, San Francisco’s Glen Park and Diamond Heights (Arcadia), has contributed to Sunset and other magazines, and writes for the family website Red Tricycle.

An Oregon Wild interview with author Emma Bland Smith

What about OR7’s story inspired you to write Journey?
After I read about OR7’s travels in the newspapers, I did some online research and was saddened to learn about how viciously and thoroughly gray wolves had been persecuted and exterminated in the United States. I wanted to let more people know about this wonderful animal and the inroads it was making into recovery. I was also intrigued by the aura of mystery surrounding OR7. Biologists weren’t exactly sure why he had roamed so unusually far from his home. I thought that trying to get inside his mind and write from his perspective would be a fun and rewarding challenge—and it was! Lastly, the story of Oregon Wild’s naming contest is a huge part of the book. I wanted to incorporate the idea that kids can make a difference and be part of animal conservation.
 
In researching OR7’s story, what surprised you most about wolf ecology and conservation?
Learning how much wolves contribute to the health of their habitat was an eye opener. Some of us—like myself!--might be drawn to the romantic notion of bringing wolves back to areas where they used to live. But on a purely ecological level, wolves have an essential role. I was amazed by the studies showing the huge positive environmental impacts wolf recovery has had on areas in Yellowstone Park. We’re only at the beginning of the process in Oregon and California, so it will be interesting to see what the effect will be.
 
As Oregon’s wolf population continues to recover, how do you foresee Journey contributing to their protection?
Conservationists have known about OR7 for years, but most people I talk to have never heard of him, or only vaguely remember reading about him in the paper. I’m hoping that this book will bring the subject of wolf recovery to the attention of a whole new mainstream audience. I think it’s almost impossible to read the details of OR7s story and not be impressed with his perseverance, and not to hope for his success and for other wolves to follow in his footsteps. The book has a lot of information incorporated into the story, as well as a lengthy nonfiction section at the back, with a timeline, photos, and map. I think that if enough adults share this book with their kids, who love animals and have open minds and hearts, we can have a new generation intent on bringing wolves back to Oregon and California.
 
If readers were to come away with one message from Journey, what would you like it to be?
I would like readers to believe that we can co-exist with wolves, as long as we work to set aside habitat for them. Wolves were almost rendered extinct in the United States because people thought this country was not big enough for the two species. But today we know that it is, and that wolves are not bloodthirsty monsters out to get humans. OR7 was able to make his journey because of the existence of various parks and natural roadless areas, that he pieced together in a corridor. But if we’re not careful, these lands will be crisscrossed with roads and spoiled by human habitation. We can live with wolves, if we make an effort to preserve land for them where they can be themselves, far from humans—“vast stretches of wilderness, not too many roads, and not too many farms—just right for wolves,” as I wrote in the book. This land exists in Oregon and in Northern California. Let’s make sure it remains safe!

Purchase Journey 
by Emma Bland Smith
(This book is great for kids!)
Photo Credits: 
Images courtesy of authors and their publishers: Beckie Elgin and Inkwater Press; Emma Bland Smith and Sasquatch Books.

Here’s to a 2017 filled with trees + community

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Jan 03, 2017.

We look forward to planting with you this year!

What the Media Missed About Malheur

By arran from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Jan 01, 2017.

A year ago, a band of militants descended on a National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, and with them came a cadre of national reporters. National reports were often simplistic, neglecting important nuances to the story and left readers and viewers with poor understanding of facts on the ground.

While local coverage by several Oregon outlets was more thorough and provided analysis, the one-year anniversary of the Malheur occupation provides an opportunity to reflect on key elements of the saga that flew under the radar.

The Malheur Occupation was a new phenomenon in Oregon

The Bundy seizure of the Malheur Refuge was not the first militia takeover of public property in Oregon, nor the first armed stand-off.  During the drought of 2001, militia groups from as far away as Jarbidge, NV and Kalispell, MT descended on Klamath Falls to participate in a takeover of the US Bureau of Reclamation’s irrigation headgates on Upper Klamath Lake, to oppose federal efforts to protect salmon and other fish.  Tensions escalated during that months-long stand-off to the point where USFWS employees were told not to wear their uniforms in town, and then-Sheriff Tim Evinger asked federal law enforcement officials to leave to avoid provoking militia members.  That stand-off was resolved on Sept. 11th, when the attack on NY City and the Pentagon prompted militia groups to finally leave.

In 2015, shortly after the Bunkerville standoff where Cliven Bundy drew national attention for over a decade of flouting the law, armed militants gathered again in southern Oregon to protest a BLM administrative action on a mine. The self-styled “Patriot” Oathkeepers issued numerous overtly false “call to arms” press releases, claiming that freedom itself hinged on the armed defense of a pair of miners who had to fill out some mining claim paperwork. It was enough to draw a number of militants from across the West who closed roads and public access, setting up an armed perimeter. The BLM offices in both Grants Pass and Klamath Falls closed for a day because employees there were receiving death threats.

The occupation was a protest about the unjust imprisonment of innocent local ranchers

While the Bundy brothers claimed to have arrived in Oregon to participate in a protest over the imprisonment of the Hammonds, their real aim was transparently the end of national public lands and aspirations of a West-wide uprising. However, Dwight Hammond and his son Steven, the ranchers imprisoned for two counts of arson on federal lands, were hardly innocent. While they did not support the occupation, both men had a long and substantial record of illegal behavior that included child abuse and threats of violence directed at environmental activists and local public lands managers. According to court documents, the 2001 arson was started to cover up deer poaching.

Many have voiced legitimate concerns with mandatory minimum sentencing and the particular law, the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, that the Hammonds were sentenced under. Unfortunately, most Hammond supporters selectively targeted the application of that particular law to the pair of ranchers, rather than the broader issues with the law itself.

The Bundy brothers were independent radicals

The Bundy’s were inspired by decades of anti-government and anti-public lands political organizing in the rural west dating back to the 1960’s.  In recent years, this movement has drawn support from the Koch brothers and other major oil and gas industry funders.  The Koch’s have backed the American Lands Council to lobby state legislatures, county commissions, and local governments all over the West to support public lands privatization, and they have funded the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to draft model bills for state legislatures demanding the transfer of public lands.

Land seizure advocates have made the most significant progress in Utah, where the 2012 Transfer of Public Lands Act required the federal government to transfer the ownership of over 30 million acres of federally protected land to the state by the end of 2014, a mandate which federal agencies did not comply with. Foreseeing federal non-compliance, the bill also set aside $4.5 million to cover the state’s legal fees, although the constitutionality of such a bill will likely not withstand the courts.

Oregon saw action on one of these ALEC-inspired bills in 2015.

The Bundy movement is made up of outsiders with no ties to Oregon

In fact, home-grown militia groups here in Oregon supported the Bundy’s, and some supported their goals for years before the Malheur seizure.  Many of the participants at the refuge stand-off participated in the Sugar Pine stand-off in 2015.  Sheriff Glenn Palmer has deep ties to militia groups in Grant County, and offered public support the Bundy’s.  Crook County also suffered the emergence of a home-grown anti-government militia group in recent years, which has proposed a natural resources management plan that would give county officials control of Forest Service lands.

Rural Organizing Project’s Guide to Oregon’s militia movement.

The spotted owl and environmentalists killed Harney County’s economy

Many national reports cited the listing of the Northern Spotted Owl under the Endangered Species Act for Harney County’s economic woes. While this may be a belief held by some individuals, it is patently false. The city of Burns and the Malheur Wildlife Refuge are over 100 miles away from the nearest old-growth habitat protected by the Northwest Forest Plan - the agreement put in place to halt the reckless clearcutting of western Oregon’s public forests and protect old growth habitat.

While some environmental standards were enacted to protect old growth trees in eastern Oregon as well, a number of other factors had a greater economic impact on the region and logging industry as a whole: increasing automation, the 2007 housing bubble, globalization, distance from markets and competition with mills in western Oregon, the fact that slower-growing dry-side forests had largely been liquidated by the clearcutting sprees on the 70s and 80s, and changing management to address forest fires. However, conservation groups like Oregon Wild have worked to help keep eastern Oregon mills open to process small diameter wood harvested from forest health restoration projects.

It’s over

The consequences of the Malheur occupation have been widespread, with the continued intimidation of some federal employees (and some rumors of direct violence) in east Oregon communities like Burns and John Day. Both on the Malheur Wildlife Refuge and Malheur National Forest, many long time employees have left, and others have been told by long-time friends that they can’t be seen together in public.

Malheur occupiers also recently announced an event in John Day, OR called “The Meeting That Never Happened.” Many are concerned this event will lead to an occupation of a Grant County Forest Service facility and that counter-protesters may face reprisals from the pro-takeover Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer.

Ryan Bundy has issued an ominous warning from from jail on the announcement that President Obama had declared new national monuments in Nevada and Utah: “The government should be scared.”

Inmates honored for conservation actions

By Jessie Brothers from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 30, 2016.

Inmates who dedicated over 100 hours managing a nursery that produces plants for habitat conservation in Oregon, such as early blue violet plants for feeding and restoring habitat for the Oregon silverspot butterfly, received Certificates of Achievement on March 18th, 2016. IAE's Executive Director, Tom Kaye, spent the morning honoring a select group of women inmates […]

Al Kitzman receives 2016 Ecological Conservation Award

By Tom Kaye from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 29, 2016.

The 2016 Ecological Conservation Award was presented to Al Kitzman for his long-term contributions to habitat restoration in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  Al retired in 2014 from the Benton County Natural Areas and Parks Department after 34 years of service.  He managed several natural areas and parks for their habitat and recreational values, including […]

Silver Falls Day Hike with Oregon Youth Authority

By Jessie Brothers from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 27, 2016.

What better way to spend a sunny day than to explore one of Oregon’s magnificent natural treasures! IAE’s education team spent the day at Silver Falls State Park with Cascadia Expeditions (CE) and a group of high school age ladies from Oregon Youth Authority’s (OYA) Young Women’s Transition Program. IAE’s Stacy Moore and Jessie Brothers partnered with Cascadia Expeditions’ Brett Gallagher on […]

Kincaid's Lupine and monitoring in Oak Basin

By IAE/NPSO Intern from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 27, 2016.

We are happy to welcome Nicholas Murray to the Conservation Research team. Nick joins us from Camas, Washington, where he will be going into his senior year of high school. This is the seventh year that IAE has sponsored a high school intern through the Apprenticeship in Science and Engineering Program (ASE). The ASE program […]

Let’s Hear It For Trees

By Kathy from Growth Rings. Published on Dec 27, 2016.

There are so many ways trees improve our lives and our world. Trees clean our air and water, provide habitat, cool us in summer, warm us in winter, speed up hospital recovery time … they even relieve stress! Trees are multi-purpose–and so are donations to Friends of Trees. A $75 donation covers the cost of 15 […]

Lupine in the high desert

By IAE/NPSO Intern from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 27, 2016.

  A couple of weeks ago the Conservation Research field crew traveled out to Unity, Oregon, to monitor Lupinus lepidus var. cusickii.  Also known as Cusick’s lupine, this small, perennial plant is listed as endangered by the Oregon Department of Agriculture, “special status” by the Bureau of Land Management, and a Species of Concern by […]

Seed Collection in Oregon’s Remaining Coastal Prairies

By Jeanette Hardison from Institute for Applied Ecology. Published on Dec 26, 2016.

Starting in 2015, IAE was awarded an opportunity to engage in collecting seed of a diversity of plant species from remnant prairies on the Central Oregon Coast. The project will support ongoing restoration efforts for the Oregon silverspot butterfly (OSB) at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge near Pacific City, and will benefit other restoration sites […]

Oregon State Parks Foundation welcomes Four New Board Members

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Dec 22, 2016.

The Oregon State Parks Foundation is pleased to welcome four new members to its Board of Directors. Jennifer Allen (ex officio) Jennifer is an Associate Professor, Public Administration, Hatfield School of Government, Portland State University.  In the past, Jennifer has served as the Director of PSU’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions, and as the Executive Vice […]

New Report Highlights 10 Wildlife Conservation Priorities for the Trump Administration

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 21, 2016.

Among list of imperiled species are Wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon, threatened by four lower Snake River dams, climate change The report, “removing the Walls to Recovery: Top 10 Species Priorities for a New Administration <http://removingthewallstorecovery.org/> ,” highlights some of the most significant threats to vanishing wildlife such as wild salmon, jaguars and elephants, […]

PGE Tests Biomass at Boardman Coal Plant – New Report Highlights Climate and Forest Consequences for Country’s Largest Biomass Proposal

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 21, 2016.

On December 7th, 2016, we released a report analyzing a proposal from Portland General Electric (PGE) to convert the state’s last coal plant in Boardman, Oregon into one of the world’s largest biomass facilities. The report finds that the proposal may pose major implications for air quality, forest health, and carbon reduction goals. The Boardman Power […]

Columbia River Treaty Update

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Dec 20, 2016.

by Greg Haller — U.S. and Canada move closer to formal negotiations The modernization of the U.S.-Canada Columbia River Treaty moved closer towards reality when the U.S. State Department finalized its negotiating position this past fall. Although the U.S. position won’t be released publicly, we believe it will be guided by the Regional Recommendation, which … Continue reading Columbia River Treaty Update

Volunteers, Members and Friends Gathering: January 26th 2017

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Dec 20, 2016.

Volunteers – are you ready to help reduce waste in your neighborhood? To reduce greenhouse gases? To help Recycling Advocates expand the BYOC (Bring Your Own Cup) campaign? There are various tasks we could use your help with as we roll out the campaign across the region. Let’s get together on Thursday January 26th, 2017 […]

The Behavioral Economics of Recycling

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Dec 20, 2016.

This is an article “The Behavioral Economics of Recycling,” recently published in the Harvard Business Review. https://hbr.org/2016/10/the-behavioral-economics-of-recycling The author is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at Questrom School of Business, Boston University. She and her colleague conducted research looking at behavioral bias in recycling and disposal habits. She found that people are more likely to recycle items that haven’t been distorted—like undented […]

City of Portland Bans New Fossil Fuel Infrastructure!

By aberman from News. Published on Dec 20, 2016.

On Wednesday afternoon, as snow began to fall in the Northwest, Portland City Council voted unanimously to enact a new city ordinance banning new fossil fuel infrastructure in the City. Joined by community leaders and grassroots activists, Council asserted Portland's leadership in the climate justice movement—this is the strongest fossil fuel infrastructure ban in any city in the United States.

FERC Rejects Jordan Cove LNG & Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline – Developer Turns to Trump

By tedgleichman from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 19, 2016.

A leader from the Yurok Klamath First Nation speaks to a NO LNG Coalition rally at the Oregon State Capitol, November 14, 2016 Article and Photos By Ted Gleichman The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has conclusively rejected the only remaining US West Coast plan to ship liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Canada and the […]

Equity Atlas 3.0

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Dec 19, 2016.

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Andrew Riley

Meyer Memorial Trust Awards $95,000 to the new Regional Equity Atlas team

On behalf of the Regional Equity Atlas project team, 1000 Friends of Oregon is proud to announce that Meyer Memorial Trust has awarded $95,000 toward the development of the next iteration of the Regional Equity Atlas!

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2017 Legislative Preview

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Dec 19, 2016.

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Mary Kyle McCurdy

The 2017 Oregon Legislative session takes off in February, and 1000 Friends of Oregon will be working to pass several legislative proposals of statewide importance, impacting both rural and urban areas.Transportation Funding. Governor Kate Brown and Oregon’s legislative leaders have promised to pass a comprehensive, multi-modal transportation funding and policy package in the 2017 session.

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Right-Sizing Population Forecasts

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Dec 19, 2016.

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Mia Nelson

& what this means for UGB’s in Oregon

Year after year, 1000 Friends opposes persistent legislative efforts to weaken Oregon’s land use protections. Often, the best outcome one can hope for is preservation of what we already have; only rarely is the program significantly strengthened.

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Update from the Circuit

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Dec 19, 2016.

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Meriel Darzen

Six months with 1000 Friends

Hello from snowy Bend! Six months ago I began work as the Circuit Rider Staff Attorney for 1000 Friends. In this short time I have met people from all over the state and worked on many interesting land use issues.

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Recycling Advocates planning for future in 2017

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Dec 19, 2016.

During my first few months of being president, I’ve gone back through some documents to get a better understanding of the history of RA. There is a long and rich history that has made a huge impact on the community. RA is a well-respected organization in the community and at the state level, and we […]

Does it Surprise Anyone that Trump's Pick for Managing Public Lands has a Wishy-Washy Record on Public Lands?

By Tara from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Dec 16, 2016.

Numerous nominations from the President-elect have created a flurry of emotions; anger, nervousness, despair, surprise, and some of them all at once. Most recently the nomination for the Department of Interior has shocked us again. 

The first Navy SEAL elected into the House of Representatives, Congressman Ryan Zinke, has been all-but officially nominated to lead the Department of Interior and oversee the agencies responsible for managing our National Parks, wildlife and their refuges, and millions of acres of landscapes owned and managed on behalf of all Americans. His efforts to keep public lands public, and to fund key natural resource programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund, has almost created a glimpse of hope for conservationist. But this shining moment of hope is quickly diminished after a closer examination into the Montana Congressman’s at best wishy-washy policy record.

Congressman Zinke’s position on keeping public lands is supposed to be his redeeming quality, especially when compared to other Interior nominees floated for the position, like Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin or Washington Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers. Both those candidates had a much more obvious hostility to national public lands. Zinke, in contrast, made a show of resigning from the GOP Platform committee when it insisted on including language supporting the transfer or sale of public lands.

Unfortunately, Zinke’s record tells a different story than the “pro-public lands” one touted by his supporters. Earlier this year, he voted against the transfer of 2 million acres of public land to states’ ownership (H.R. 3650), and then turned around and voted to enact a pilot program to cede management authority of up to 4 million acres of federally owned public lands to states (H.R 2316). While H.R 2316 may not formally privatize public lands, it would allow states to start managing these lands and was regarded as the first step to selling them off. Congressman Zinke’s claimed protections of public lands are thin at best, and this pilot program would directly go against keeping public lands public. In fact, Zinke's House of Representatives colleague and anti-public lands zealot Rob Bishop has called his touted public lands defense position "spin."

While Congressman Zinke has supported strong funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, he still has no consistent position on climate change. In 2010, then-state senator Zinke signed a letter pressuring President Obama and Congress to pass legislation on clean energy and climate change, but then in 2014 while running for Congress, Zinke flipped his position on climate change by challenging the scientific evidence behind global warming. Since this flip in position Zinke has taken large contributions from the oil and gas industry and strongly supported loopholes for his supporting coal industries.

Congressman Zinke’s support and advocacy for the coal industry only shows his complete disregard for the changing climate and public lands that are the natural heritage for future generations. Not only has he continually aided in the coal companies’ dream of preserving loopholes in policy to avoid royalty payments to local communities and U.S. taxpayers alike, he has also believes that fossil fuels are pertinent to “energy independence.” Zinke’s once call for climate change legislation now promotes and supports the degradation of lands for fossil fuel extraction. The Congressman has continually criticized the Clean Power Plan, which is a policy to combat climate change, and instead supported the devastating construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. His back and forth support for public lands while also supporting the penetration of our natural places for extraction purposes is alarming.

Zinke’s flip-flop on climate change and the privatization of public lands only further raise questions about his policy positions. If the coal industry’s coffers can persuade the Congressman from supporting climate change initiatives, to advocating coal extraction, then which other positions will he flip on? Will the next flip be our public lands going into the deepest pockets? These policy flips are unacceptable and the public will hold the Congressman accountable to his promises to keep public lands public and to support climate change solutions.  

Photo Credits: 
Zinke photo by Gage Skidmore, Creative Commons Crater Lake photo by Kathleen Hahn

Keepers of the Door by Brock Evans

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Dec 16, 2016.

This piece was written by one of our founding members, current board member, and conservation hero Brock Evans nearly 15 years ago.  The piece is as relevant today as it was then.  Take heart, fellow Keepers of the Door! Keepers of the Door I find much to be happy about, living in these times. Our […]

Why I Give. What Inspires You?

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Dec 15, 2016.

I did it. I took the leap and made the commitment. I admit that at first, automatic monthly withdraws from my checking account gave me minor heart palpitations.  It’s not that I was afraid of committing; I was just nervous about meeting my monthly budget and trying to save a bit. This last part would make my Depression era-molded Grandmas proud. I could give once a year which is perfectly wonderful and great, but to be honest, I don’t want the hassle of remembering organizations each December and being worried that my checking account can’t handle all the year-end gifts that I frantically make in Read More

Beyond Toxics Speaks Truth to Timber’s Tall Tales

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Dec 15, 2016.

AERIAL SPRAY RESPONSE: (this was published as a Letter to the Editor of the Eugene Weekly) The Register Guard published a Nov. 30 guest viewpoint written by former Lane County Commissioner, Anna Morrison, who no longer lives in Oregon. Displaying her ignorance, she suggested that aerial pesticide sprays are nothing to worry about. If Morrison... Read more »

The post Beyond Toxics Speaks Truth to Timber’s Tall Tales appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

Interim Director Lynn Peterson will join 1000 Friends this January

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Dec 15, 2016.

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Thu, 12/15/2016 - 12:00pm

1000 Friends of Oregon Board announces transportation and land use expert Lynn Peterson to serve as interim executive director

Former Clackamas County Commissioner has also served as a senior transportation advisor to and Transportation Secretary in Oregon and Washington

CONTACT: Mary Kyle McCurdy, 503-497-1000 x130, mkm@friends.org

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Top Ten Things You Can Do To Support Solar Oregon

By Lisa Logie from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Dec 15, 2016.

Essentials Become a member. Annual membership dues range from $20-$60 a year. Truly committed may consider a Lifetime membership. Volunteer. There are frequently opportunities where help is needed. Your help. Engage others. Interact with the community and talk about the benefits of solar energy. Encourage others to consider investment in solar technology, and to join […]

Community Solar: An Exciting Next Step for Solar in Oregon

By Lisa Logie from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Dec 14, 2016.

Community solar is a phrase that has been popping up in lots of places around the country. Essentially, community solar allows consumers who can’t put solar on their roof for some reason (too much shade, they rent, local homeowner associations are too restrictive) to buy into a larger system and see the energy benefits on […]

Trip Leader Training

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Dec 14, 2016.

February 18, 2017 Tualatin Heritage Center 10am – 4pm This training includes a classroom session that will cover the volunteer job positions plus TRK history and current programs descriptions, fleet/equipment review, a riverside “mock” paddle trip training, and (weather-permitting) a paddle trip.

Elliott State Forest sale halted... for now

By arran from Oregon Wild blogs. Published on Dec 13, 2016.

We did it! 

Thanks to your voice, thousands of other Oregon Wild activists, partner organizations, and many more who have been working on this issue for years, the State Land Board delayed their vote on a proposal to privatize the Elliott State Forest. 

But we are not out of the woods yet!

Over 200 people attended the meeting in Keizer, and a large majority of those that testified urged Governor Kate Brown, and outgoing State Treasurer Ted Wheeler and Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins, to reject the proposal to sell the Elliott to Lone Rock logging. Staff for the Department of State Lands (DSL) admitted prior to the meeting that that the lone privatization bid contains “gaps, uncertainties and ambiguities.” 

However, Gov. Brown's statements on the Elliott were contradictory.  She directed DSL staff to develop an alternative proposal to keep the Elliott and its old-growth forests in public ownership, but also asked them to work Lone Rock logging to make their privatization bid more palatable to the public.  

Still, the decision not to go forward with privatization is a strong rejection of the Bundy movement and welcome victory given the steady stream of bad news out of Washington D.C. Now we must focus our efforts on developing a proposal that protects the Elliott's old-growth and keeps the forest in public hands.  

We’ll be counting on your help in the coming months to protect our public lands!

Photo Credits: 
Elliott State Forest photo by Greg Vaughn

Wetland Gift Guide

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

It feels good to give loved ones awesome presents, especially gifts that benefit Oregon’s wetlands. Shop from the list below and your purchase will benefit not just your gifts recipient, but the work of The Wetlands Conservancy. Pack your sleeping bag, an adventurous spirit and join us for a weekend at Camp Westwind.  Located on

The post Wetland Gift Guide appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Beaver T-Shirt

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 07, 2016.

The post Beaver T-Shirt appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Tell State Lawmakers: Cancel the Elliot State Forest Sale

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

By Mike Allen In one week the State Land Board will vote on whether to sell the oldest state forest in Oregon. The Elliott State Forest near Coos bay is home to several threatened or endangered species including Coho salmon, Pacific lamprey, spotted owl, and the vanishing marbeled murrelet. The murrelet nests high in large […]

Its Winter in the Northwest….Best Time to Eat Lots of Delicious Local Seafood!

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Dec 06, 2016.

Planning a holiday gathering or meal out with a friend? Consider going to TWC’s longtime supporters; Nostrana, St Jack, La Moule or XICO. These restaurants each have a deep commitment to sustainable seafood and understanding of the importance of conserving and restoring healthy estuaries. Cathy Whims of Nostrana states it best “At Nostrana, our menu

The post Its Winter in the Northwest….Best Time to Eat Lots of Delicious Local Seafood! appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

Rally for the Elliott State Forest

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

This is it! The Oregon Department of State Lands has received a bid that would see the Elliott State Forest sold to a private timber company and heavily logged. Our elected leaders, including Governor Kate Brown, Treasurer Ted Wheeler, and Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins have the opportunity to stop the privatization process and Save […]

Europe Maintains Commitment to Ambition and Action at Recent Marrakesh Climate Talks

By Christopher Webb from Conservancy Talk. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

2016 is now set to be the warmest year on record[1]. In Europe, this observed climate change has already led to a wide range of impacts on the environment, economy and human health[2]. Counted together, European countries make up the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world[3], and recognizing the risks of inaction, […]

Beers Made By Walking returns to Eugene

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

Drink up the land when Beers Made By Walking returns this winter. The Continue reading

Coyote Creek Meadows Protected

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 01, 2016.

With your generous support, 38 acres of wetlands and camas-filled meadows are now permanently protected for conservation. Continue reading

Emphasis on writing names on Starbucks cups distracts from bigger problem

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 30, 2016.

This letter was sent to the Oregonian/Oregonlive letter to the editor from Betty Patton, regarding a front page snippet on November 29th about people using the name “Trump” on their Starbucks coffee cups. I found it interesting, almost amusing that Starbucks’ coffee cups are being used by customers to irritate more progressive baristas by claiming […]

WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO FREE THE SNAKE RIVER

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

The Northwest used to be home to the greatest salmon runs in the world: The Columbia-Snake River System. Snake River salmon migrate farther and higher than any salmon on the planet, through eight dams and inland to their high-elevation mountain homes in eastern Oregon, Washington and Idaho. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild … Continue reading WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO FREE THE SNAKE RIVER

In Memoriam: Justin Buri

By madeline from The Latest. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

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Andrew Riley
Tue, 11/29/2016 - 1:03am

1000 Friends of Oregon mourns the loss of Justin Buri, who passed away on November 1st, 2016. Justin was well-known in our community as a champion of housing justice: he served as a board member of Housing Land Advocates, a core member of the statewide Inclusionary Zoning Coalition, and as former Executive Director of the Community Alliance of Tenants.

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Departments of Justice and Housing and Urban Development Release Updated Fair Housing Act Guidance on State and Local Land Use Laws

By andrew from The Latest. Published on Nov 29, 2016.

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Mary Kyle McCurdy
Tue, 11/29/2016 - 12:12pm

The US Justice Department and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently released updated guidance on how to apply the federal Fair Housing Act (FHA) to state and local land use and zoning laws.  The FHA prohibits discrimination in housing based on disability, race, color, religion, national ori

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Rally for wild salmon!

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help. Please RSVP to attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, […]

Two Year State Parks Calendar Available

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

Oregon State Parks calendars are here! We have a gorgeous 8.5″ x 11″ calendar with stunning images from Oregon State Parks.  Unlike a classic calendar, this is a TWO YEAR calendar (2017 & 2018). Make a donation to the Foundation of $20 or more before December 31, 2016, and we will send you this fabulous calendar as […]

A Safe Place for All to Visit

By katie from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Nov 28, 2016.

Two weeks ago the staff of Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center gathered in Jawbone Flats to celebrate the end of another successful program season.  more...

“Behind The Scenes” with our Executive Director

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

Learn a bit about the Foundation from our Executive Director, Seth Miller,  from this recent interview with KXL-FM’s Brett Reckamp http://bit.ly/2eYNe54

Abolish the EPA? Clean Water and Healthy Communities at Risk

By Sharon Selvaggio from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Nov 22, 2016.

(By Sharon Selvaggio, Healthy Wildlife and Water Program Director)

President-elect Donald Trump has threatened to eliminate the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on numerous occasions. This rhetoric has been popular with conservatives for years. But is the agency really headed for the trash bin?

As The Year Ends, a Letter from our Director

By Kendra Manton from The Wetlands Conservancy. Published on Nov 21, 2016.

Dear Friends and Supporters, While wetlands are adaptable by their nature, threats like climate change, rising sea levels sprawl and competing water uses may be more than they can withstand. Without healthy wetlands * We lose natural resiliency that create refuges of green during droughts. * The oysters, crab and salmon won’t have the clean

The post As The Year Ends, a Letter from our Director appeared first on The Wetlands Conservancy.

On Replanting

By soccer21chr from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 17, 2016.

Imagine that you were told by your neighbor that he was going to tear down your house, rip out your plumbing, (and spray you with a blend of chemicals (something we won’t get into here). In response to your protests, he just calmly told you not to worry: “Oregon law requires that I rebuild it.” […]

UPDATE #3: Portland Moving Forward Against New Fossil Fuel Infrastructure

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Sometimes it takes a long time for things to happen quickly — in this case, good things.  Portland City Council is finally poised to approve unprecedented zoning restrictions on new fossil fuel infrastructure (FFI) for export or storage, before year’s end.  This process began in 2015, culminating last November with a pair of unprecedented binding policy […]

Holiday Open House December 9th

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Nov 15, 2016.

Open house for members and supporters at our office on Friday, December 9th,  7:30 p.m. through 9:00 ish.  Feel free to bring cookies, refreshing beverages, etc.  We will have food, wine, hot mulled things, and good cheer!  (We may need a little extra this season!) Who: You and HCPC members What: Holiday Open House When: […]

Restore Wild Salmon – Remove the Lower Snake River Dams!

By rhettlawrence from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help. Please attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria! […]

We won’t stop working for clean water and healthy rivers for all

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Nov 14, 2016.

Fellow River Lovers, For many on our staff the past few days have felt very dark, we like many others are afraid of what is coming. We’ve dedicated our lives to protecting the rivers of the Pacific Northwest for the good of all people and we’ve heard many messages from the President-elect that run contrary … Continue reading We won’t stop working for clean water and healthy rivers for all

Union Pacific Rail Double Track Project through Mosier, OR Denied

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 13, 2016.

At their Nov 10th meeting Wasco County Board of Commissioners voted 3-0 to finalize their Nov, 3rd decision to deny the permit for Union Pacific’s proposed rail expansion. To read more about the decision http://gorgenewscenter.com/wasco-county-commissioners-complete-their-denial-of-union-pacific-plan-for-second-main-line-track-at-mosier/ Highlights from the Nov 3rd Wasco Board of Commissioners meeting: Gary Kahn, an attorney representing Friends of the Columbia Gorge, […]

Air Toxics are Unreported, thus Unaccounted

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Nov 13, 2016.

Portland Clean Air is releasing today a new report calling into question the validity of Oregon’s air permitting system. The study, A Comparison of Toxic Chemical Use by Permit Type in Multnomah and Washington County, looks at toxic chemicals used by manufacturers in Multnomah and Washington Counties that are reported to the State Fire Marshall... Read more »

The post Air Toxics are Unreported, thus Unaccounted appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

After the election: Turning a negative into a positive

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 12, 2016.

The presidential election was a shock to many of us. After some reflection over the past few days, I have a new outlook. As the new President of Recycling Advocates, I’d like to share that perspective with you as we start looking ahead to 2017 under a new political landscape. 1) We have momentum on […]

Charting the Path Ahead

By Ashley Chesser from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Nov 11, 2016.

"The United States now enters uncharted territory, with a president-elect who has precious little political experience and is deeply distrusted by a huge portion of the American public." -Politico

Standing up for public lands

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

Let’s stand together for public lands. If you have been taking your public lands for granted, this year has been a wake-up call to rise in support of our natural heritage.

You never know what you might learn when you get a Ticket2Ride!

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Nov 10, 2016.

KGW’s Grant’s Getaways recently aired a story about our new Ticket2Ride program. Click the picture to check it out here:

Sunnyside Coffee Perks in Portland

By recycleadvocates from . Published on Nov 10, 2016.

Sunnyside (Portland) has great coffee shops!  Go ahead and sit and stay awhile….the aroma, creative spaces, artwork, comfy indoor and outdoor seating are inviting you to linger.  When you do, ask for a “cup for here” or “to stay” or “a ceramic mug, please,” or offer up your own travel cup (BYOC) and pass on […]

Thank You for Six Great Years

By alyson from The Latest. Published on Nov 09, 2016.

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1000 Friends of Oregon and Jason Miner
Wed, 11/09/2016 - 12:10pm

Today we are proud to announce the transition of 1000 Friends of Oregon’s Executive Director Jason Miner to serve as Oregon’s next Natural Resources Policy Director in Governor Kate Brown’s cabinet.

read more

Oregon Politicians Attempting to Roll Back Hard-Fought Protections for Salmon and Floodplains

By aberman from News. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

After years of effort by Portland Audubon and other conservation groups, Oregon is poised to implement important and long overdue protections for Oregon’s floodplains (flood-prone areas). However, some Oregon politicians are now doing the bidding of big developers and trying to make a last-ditch effort to undo these reforms. We will need your help to send a strong message to the Governor and the Oregon Delegation that they need to support these reforms and put protection of our communities, our environment, and our economy above the profits of irresponsible developers.

The Hook Brings You Back

By Adam Chenoweth from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

In my short time living in Jawbone Flats, I have paid attention to what brings people here, what keeps people coming back, and what  more...

Open and Accountable Elections Portland

By magdamendez from Oregon Sierra Club Blog. Published on Nov 01, 2016.

The Problem Many communities face barriers to their voices being heard in our democracy.  One in three Portlanders are people of color, and yet we have only had two people of color ever serve on our City Council.  The majority of our population is female and we have had just seven women on the City […]

Moving forward from the Malheur Refuge takeover

By Gena Goodman-Campbell from Press Releases. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Earlier this year thousands of people from all across the country expressed their peaceful opposition to the armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Today those thousands of people and millions of Americans from all walks of life continue to cherish the public lands that belong to all of us.

Audubon Society of Portland Statement on the Verdict in the Malheur Occupation Case

By aberman from News. Published on Oct 28, 2016.

Audubon Society of Portland is deeply disappointed by the jury’s verdict in the case of seven defendants who occupied Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in early 2016. We respect the legal process, but believe that the armed occupation of public lands, which included destruction of public property and disturbance of Native American archaeological sites, should have resulted in substantial penalties.

Central Oregon Community College Redmond Campus will be 90% Solar Powered

By Lisa Logie from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Oct 27, 2016.

Installation of Central Oregon Community College’s (COCC) half megawatt solar array at the school’s Redmond campus is now complete and went live today (Thursday, Oct. 27). The College and its partners celebrated the milestone with an event that included remarks from US Senator Ron Wyden and Redmond Mayor George Endicott. The array, funded through a […]

Coos Bay nonprofit gets a major contribution from the sun

By Lisa Logie from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Oct 26, 2016.

COOS BAY, Ore. – October 26, 2016 – The Nancy Devereux Center held an event today to unveil a new solar electric system that will cut operating costs and could even help expand its services to the community. The Nancy Devereux Center, 1200 Newmark Avenue, Coos Bay, is a nonprofit organization founded in 1979 to […]

Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Regain Salmon-Bearing Wetlands in Ancestral Homeland

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

The purchase of the Fivemile Creek property restores Tribe’s ancestral homeland while protecting critical coho salmon habitat. Continue reading

The Oregon Desert Trail invites you to get inspired

By Renee Patrick from Press Releases. Published on Oct 24, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) is presenting a series of events west of the Cascades that will inspire you to head over the mountains and discover the high desert on your next hiking trip. The 750-mile Oregon Desert Trail begins right outside of Bend in the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, and through a series of trails, old 2-track roads, and cross-country travel, hikers will discover mountains, deserts, rivers, and canyons to end in the stunning Owyhee Canyonlands area.

Near Nightmare on Roosevelt Boulevard

By Joel Iboa from Beyond Toxics. Published on Oct 17, 2016.

I love my home. I have lived in Eugene my entire life. Every night I rest my head on my pillow in the Whitaker as I have since I was a boy. The only other neighborhood I have lived in is Jefferson Westside. My cousins currently live in West Eugene. Comprised of Bethel and Trainsong neighborhoods... Read more »

The post Near Nightmare on Roosevelt Boulevard appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

Consumption, Conservation, and Commitment: Lessons from Borneo

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Oct 14, 2016.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness,” wrote Samuel Longhorn Clemens in Innocents Abroad. “Charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”  With Mark Twain’s admonition in mind, this summer John Bliss (OSU Professor Emeritus and Greenbelt board member) led a class of OSU students to explore conservation on the island of Borneo, one of the world’s great hotspots of biodiversity.  Their objectives were to identify major conservation challenges, learn from conservation leaders, and make connections between the Borneo situation and their own in the Willamette Valley. It wasn’t difficult to identify the biggest Read More

Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Matter

By Kim Leval from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Oct 10, 2016.

[By Kim Leval, Executive Director, with input from Ashley Chesser, Chair, NCAP Diversity Team; Megan Dunn, Healthy People and Communities Program Director]

DiverseLeaves.jpg

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, October 10, 2016, the Board of Directors and staff of the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides release our newly updated Equity, Diversity and Inclusion statement.

How the Greater Hells Canyon Region Will Help Species Suvive Climate Change: Connectivity Is Key

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Oct 06, 2016.

Guest Blog by Marina Richie, HCPC’s newest board member.  Welcome, Marina! Have you ever watched the play of light and shadows on the bunchgrass shoulders that pitch down into Hells Canyon? Have you savored the summit of Eagle Cap on a cloudless morning with dizzying views of alpine lakes and peaks in all directions? Have […]

ONDA volunteers perform restoration work at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Oct 02, 2016.

Fifteen Oregon Natural Desert Association volunteers pulled roughly 1.5 miles of obsolete barbed wire fence over three days at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Oregon.

Exploring the Willamette River

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Oct 01, 2016.

Over the past few years, I’ve traversed the Willamette River in all four seasons. The open Piney Woods, flooded ravines, and the bank of the Willamette provide some unique ecological niches and spectacular vistas. This year, I walked all the main trails of Willamette Park and several of the overgrown paths connecting them. I plan on making my own map with some whimsical place names. This photo journal covers the spring and summer seasons.                     Blog post and photos by Rick Kleinosky. Rick is a Corvallis resident, valued Greenbelt Land Trust member, and celebrated local photographer. You’ll often Read More

Space Prom in Jawbone Flats

By Barrett Zimmerman from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

The sound of the tractor rumbles up the hill as I stroll down from my cabin. James has decided that instead of the white  more...

Producer Roundtable Gathers Grower Input

By Jade Florence from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Sep 26, 2016.

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On August 24th, the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides held a producer roundtable event in partnership with Purple Sage Farms in Middleton, Idaho. Attendees were representative of the food supply chain from production to consumer education and product development. Of all attendees, 60% were producers and 40% worked in other areas of the food supply chain. 

Oregonians Applaud House Introduction of Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Bill

By Pacific Rivers from Pacific Rivers. Published on Sep 23, 2016.

September 23, 2016 — Portland, Ore—Today, Congressman Peter DeFazio introduced a bill that would protect roughly 100,000 acres in Douglas County, Oregon. The legislation was introduced by Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley in the Senate in May, 2015, and passed out of the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources in July, 2016. The Frank … Continue reading Oregonians Applaud House Introduction of Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Bill

Fall Gala on October 22, 2016!

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Sep 22, 2016.

Saturday, October 22, 5 – 9 pm Catholic Church Parish Hall 1002 L Avenue, La Grande, Oregon  Please join us for a special night of socializing, celebrating, fundraising, and getting energized to protect, connect, and restore our wonderful corner of the planet. Tickets are $25 for adults; $10 for youth ages 5 – 12; and […]

Tom Simpson joins Oregon State Parks Foundation Board

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Sep 22, 2016.

The Oregon State Parks Foundation welcomes Tom Simpson, Director of Government & Regulatory Affairs at The Standard, as the newest member of its Board of Trustees. Mr. Simpson represents The Standard before federal, state and legislative bodies and other public policy decision makers. In addition to the Foundation Board, Mr. Simpson is a member […]

Protections for the Oregon Spotted Frog

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Sep 20, 2016.

After years of illegal grazing, KS Wild and our allies have secured an initial court victory that requires the Forest Service to do its job and protect rare frogs and their fragile riparian habitat.

Nedsbar Timber Sale

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Sep 20, 2016.

KS Wild filed a formal protest on September 15 2016.

Rachel Carson Award Winners 2016

By Ashley Chesser from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Sep 19, 2016.

NCAP is excited to present the Rachel Carson Award to the following individuals for each of our program areas at the 2016 Healthy Harvest Celebration on September 30.

Regulating air for community health – a new concept in Oregon?

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Sep 19, 2016.

Governor Kate Brown initiated the Cleaner Air Oregon campaign after state agencies discovered that glass makers were the source of heavy metals – arsenic, cadmium, nickel and chromium – impacting nearby neighborhoods in Portland. Toxics heavy metals were found in the air and in the soil, including the soil of home gardens. Children were taken... Read more »

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Desert Conference: Public Lands, Common Ground brings diverse voices to Bend October 14

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Sep 16, 2016.

The 2016 Desert Conference will bring landowners, conservationists, elected officials, scientists and engaged citizens together in Bend on Oct. 14 to explore shared solutions for managing our public lands.

Giving Pokémon GO a Go

By Rebecca McKay Steinberg from Greenbelt Land Trust. Published on Sep 14, 2016.

The Challenge What do you do when you are tasked with entertaining three hungry and restless 9-year-old boys? This is the challenge that Claire Fiegener, Greenbelt’s Conservation Director, faced one afternoon. Her twin sons and their friend were jumping around because they were super psyched to play Pokémon GO. They invited me to tag along so I could see first-hand what this craze is all about. Claire and I had no clue what Pokémon Go was about, or why it has become the latest virtual craze. What is the allure that has kids and adults alike walking through the streets day and night totally oblivious Read More

Explore the Oregon Desert Trail by Boots, Bike or Boat

By Corinne Handelman from Press Releases. Published on Sep 12, 2016.

Join the Oregon Natural Desert Association and the Mountain Shop to learn about new opportunities to explore your public land on the 750 mile Oregon Desert Trail; on foot, by bike or packraft. Our adventure panelists will discuss the value of public lands and importance of proper gear to set out on your next Eastern Oregon exploration!

Patchmarks creates collectible Oregon State Parks Patches and Stickers

By OSPF from Oregon State Parks Foundation. Published on Sep 09, 2016.

Patchmarks has designed some great Oregon State Parks patches and stickers. You can purchase them on their website and a portion of the proceeds go to the Oregon State Parks Foundation! Visit their website to see which ones are available. Over the next several months they will be releasing more and you can signup on their […]

Judge: U.S. Army Corps Illegally Authorized Cormorant Killing on Columbia River

By aberman from News. Published on Sep 01, 2016.

A federal district court ruled late Wednesday that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers acted unlawfully by failing to consider alternatives to killing double-crested cormorants on the Columbia River.

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Threatened Marbled Murrelet From Logging on Former Elliott State Forest

By aberman from News. Published on Aug 25, 2016.

Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity and Portland Audubon filed a lawsuit in federal court today seeking to block Scott Timber Company from logging a portion of a 355-acre parcel of land that until 2014 was part of the 93,000-acre Elliott State Forest and provides habitat for the threatened Marbled Murrelet.

Back to School: Join the Call to Protect Students

By Megan Dunn from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Aug 22, 2016.

(By Megan Dunn, Healthy People and Communities Program Director) 

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Across the country over 50 million kids are heading back to school–and they need you to advocate for healthy standards!

A Perfect Pairing

By Kim Leval from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Aug 18, 2016.

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Perched on a hill in Dundee, Oregon, Cameron Winery provided spectacular views of the valley for NCAP’s recent Dinner in the Vineyard event. Guests shared a gorgeous summer evening of wine, food and stories with their vintner hosts John Paul and Teri Wadsworth.

Summer Potluck 2017

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Aug 15, 2016.

It’s August again, and time for our Annual Summer Potluck!  This was one of our favorite events last year, and we can’t wait to see you at it again! Who: You and any new friends you care to bring! What: A casual potluck packed with amazing food and great conversation about conservation in the Greater Hells Canyon Region today.  All of HCPC […]

Supporting Sustainable Agriculture Producers

By Jade Florence from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Aug 15, 2016.

This month, the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) held a summer meeting on August 7-10 in Orono, ME. NSAC advocates for federal policy reform for the sustainability of food systems, natural resources, and rural communities. NCAP partners with NSAC to advocate for policies and programs that promote agricultural practices to conserve our soil, water, wildlife habitat, and energy resources.

Wild & Scenic Film Festival brings best outdoor, conservation films to Bend on September 9

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Aug 12, 2016.

Experience rock climbing in Lebanon, skiing in Antarctica and more when the Wild & Scenic Film Festival makes its stop in Bend on Friday, Sept. 9. Tickets are on sale now for two screenings at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend.

Clean Water, Healthy Soil

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Aug 11, 2016.

The Tualatin Soil and Conservation District has served the people of Washington County since 1955. The District is asking voters to approve a permanent tax levy to provide services needed to protect the water, soil, and other natural resources in Washington County. The resource needs of the region exceed the District’s ability to provide services. […]

Crow Feather Farm

By Ellen Rifkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

Beyond Toxics is publicizing local gardens friendly to our increasingly fragile population of pollinators. In this blog we visit Jessica Jackowski’s garden in Eugene. Along a path at Crow Feather Farm, borage blossoms unfurl in spirals. A honeybee dances among them, then attaches herself upside down to a nectar-rich mini-grotto, proboscis sucking up sweetness. A... Read more »

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“Herbicides as a Last Resort” – A County Policy Ignored, Never Defined and Never Implemented

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jul 26, 2016.

Beyond Toxics was one of the members of a Lane County Roadside Integrated Vegetation Management Plan Stakeholders group. The IVMP stakeholder group was very diverse, with members ranging from the Lane County Farm Bureau to NCAP to ODA to Beyond Toxics. The reason I agreed to join the IVMP stakeholder group was to tackle the... Read more »

The post “Herbicides as a Last Resort” – A County Policy Ignored, Never Defined and Never Implemented appeared first on Beyond Toxics.

Elected Officials Race in Canoes and Kayaks August 6, 2016

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Jul 25, 2016.

The winner is… Tigard City Councilor John Goodhouse. Also participating (L to R) … State Rep Joe Gallegos Jen Nelson, Tualatin Soil & Water Conservation District Forest Grove City Councilor Victoria Lowe Mark Jockers, Clean Water Services Washington County Commissioner Roy Rogers Tigard City Councilor John Goodhouse (winner) Washington County Commissioner Dick Schouten Team Gallegos Tualatin […]

A New Life in a Different World

By Bryan Kurz from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jul 25, 2016.

It’s hard to describe exactly what Opal Creek is without experiencing it for yourself. For me it has been eye opening in beauty and  more...

Stronger Implementation

By Sharon Selvaggio from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Jul 20, 2016.

NCAP Successfully Opposes Efforts to Weaken Oregon’s Aerial Spraying Rules

(By Sharon Selvaggio and Megan Dunn) 

In June 2016, Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) finalized rules addressing aerial pesticide spraying. NCAP’s involvement helped to ensure the rule reflects the values of Oregonians and helps to safeguard the health of their communities. The final rule OAR 603-057-0108 reflected NCAP’s comments, and will help ensure that spray operators are held to high standards in the law addressing training prior to being issued an aerial pesticide applicator’s certificate. 

Sign Up for Summer Hike July 30th

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jul 19, 2016.

Hey Nature Lovers—join us for a hike on Saturday, July 30th in Wallowa County! We’ll hike up the beautiful Hurricane Creek Trail to the Slick Rock Creek crossing, for a total of 6.5 miles. Last summer, a wildfire burned in parts of the Hurricane Creek drainage. We’ll get a look at it one year out, […]

East Face Vegetative Management Project Review

By Kirsten Johnson from Hells Canyon Preservation Council. Published on Jul 14, 2016.

The East Face Vegetative Management Project. Those of us who live in Union and Baker Counties have probably heard this name kicked around, but might not know the details of this timber project, especially as the details have changed over time. This blog takes a look at what East Face has become and how Hells […]

Remembering Deb

By aberman from News. Published on Jul 09, 2016.

Deb Sheaffer, Portland Audubon’s Wildlife Veterinarian, passed away on July 5, just a little more than a month after she learned that the cancer she had battled so bravely last summer had returned. Our deepest condolences go out to Deb's husband Ron, her children, Nate and Mary, and all those who knew and loved her.

Video Series: All-Seasons Approach to Monitoring and Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila

By Sharon Selvaggio from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Jul 07, 2016.

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Widen your focus to include proactive approaches for managing spotted wing drosophila throughout the year! View the following videos taken from a webinar hosted by NCAP on April 12, 2016.

We Need Resilient Forests

By Lisa Arkin from Beyond Toxics. Published on Jun 30, 2016.

“Timber’s Cover-Up” tells the forest story and offers solutions … in 4 minutes Recently, I had lunch in the employee cafeteria of an international corporation based in Lane County. I was somewhat amazed, but pleased, to see efforts to celebrate Farm Worker Appreciation Week. There were large colorful posters of farm workers and glossy brochures. ... Read more »

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Greater Protections Sought for Threatened Marbled Murrelets in Oregon

By aberman from News. Published on Jun 21, 2016.

Conservation groups submitted petitions today asking the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Oregon Board of Forestry to take new measures to better identify and protect important forest areas for protected marbled murrelets.

Oregon Appeals Court Set to Rule on Plan to Sell off Elliott State Forest

By aberman from News. Published on Jun 15, 2016.

The Oregon Court of Appeals is set to decide the legality of a 788-acre timber sale on the Elliott State Forest following a court hearing last Friday.

Groups Plan to Sue over Pacific fisher

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Jun 14, 2016.

KS Wild was joined by several conservation groups who plan to sue the federal government for backtracking on more than a decade's worth of studies when it failed this spring to list the Pacific fisher as a threatened species, saying isolated populations, including those in southwest Oregon, warrant protection.

New and updated materials now available for Oregon Desert Trail

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on Jun 13, 2016.

New tools and updated information are now available to help plan adventure on the Oregon Desert Trail, a 750-mile route through Oregon’s high desert.

Wilsonville Bee Stewards Project

By jeremy olsen from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Jun 12, 2016.

In 2013, the shocking death of an estimated 50,000 bumblebees in the parking lot of a Wilsonville, Oregon shopping center catalyzed a worldwide conversation about bee health and pesticides. The cause? Those bees visited trees treated with pesticides. The incident, with photos of bees littering the asphalt, became national news and was featured on the cover of Time magazine, in the LA Times and in The Huffington Post bringing the previously arcane topic of neonicotinoid insecticides into millions of American households.

Detective Work in the Ancient Forest

By Claudia Christensen Garcia from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jun 10, 2016.

I moved to Jawbone Flats in March with the understanding that I would spend the spring season developing skills as an environmental educator. What  more...

Understanding the IARC Cancer Listing For Glyphosate

By Megan Dunn from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on May 26, 2016.

(by Megan Dunn, Healthy People and Communities Program Director)

In March of 2015, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) listed the chemical glyphosate–the active ingredient in Roundup–as a ‘probable carcinogen’ (International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2015). Glyphosate is the most widely used pesticide, a common tool for groundskeepers in schools and parks, and aggressively sold to homeowners. Community members across the country have been responding to this new classification and while many are justifiably worried, many are still skeptical. What does the IARC mean by “probable?” Isn’t glyphosate as safe as a tanning bed?

 

Ruling protects Greater Sage-Grouse on Steens Mountain

By Heidi Hagemeier from Press Releases. Published on May 26, 2016.

A three-judge panel from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a ruling May 26 that rejects the Secretary of the Interior’s approval of an industrial-scale wind project proposed for Steens Mountain.

Great Blue Heron Week: June 1 - June 12

By aberman from News. Published on May 26, 2016.

Join us for Great Blue Heron Week and explore Portland's official bird as you discover natural areas all around the city.

Tremendous sugar pines in the Applegate

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on May 23, 2016.

The Butte Fork trail is the lowest elevation and most gentle of all the hiking routes in the Red Buttes Mountains. There’s a lot to love about this route through the last untouched valley in the upper Applegate, including wildflowers, views of the snowy Siskiyou Crest ridgeline and the cascading of the Butte Fork and its tributaries. Surprising old-growth Sugar Pines along the trail to Cedar Basin will not disappoint.

Cormorant Nesting Colony Targeted by Federal Agencies Suffers Complete Failure

By aberman from News. Published on May 20, 2016.

Audubon Society of Portland calls on federal agencies to permanently stop the slaughter of cormorants and immediately launch a comprehensive investigation of the killing program

Plan Your Summer Adventures with Tualatin Riverkeepers

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on May 04, 2016.

This Summer Tualatin Riverkeepers has a big menu of adventures for you to experience.  Canoe trips, kayak trips, the ever popular waterfall tour, River Professors Lectures and a new event, the Bird & Wine Tour are planned for you.  Join our group events. Check out the complete menu  and register online at our Eventbrite Page. […]

Update: Westside Salvage Logging

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on May 03, 2016.

Clearcutting has started in the recovering post-fire "Westside Salvage" logging units. KS Wild is supporting the Karuk Tribe in emergency legal motions that will ask the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in early May to halt the logging while affected wildlands and wildlife get their day in court. Cross your fingers and stay tuned as we continue to do all we can to promote real restoration and protect forests and watersheds of the Marble Mountains from clearcutting.

Safety Video Emphasizes the Right Life Jacket Fit for Kids

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on May 01, 2016.

NCAP's Statement About the Zika Virus

By Kim Leval from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Apr 29, 2016.

Keeping informed about disease outbreaks and how to protect you and your family is important. Vectors such as mosquitoes can transmit disease. Zika virus is one of many vector-borne diseases and is primarily transmitted by aedes species mosquitoes. Zika virus is spreading and is being linked to birth defects in babies born to women who have contracted the disease while pregnant.

Tribe AND Conservationists File Suit to Protect Wild Salmon, Rural River Communities

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Apr 27, 2016.

The Karuk Tribe, along with the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center (KS Wild), Center for Biological Diversity, and Klamath Riverkeeper, filed suit in federal court challenging a massive post-fire logging plan in Klamath National Forest that will increase fire danger, degrade water quality, and harm at-risk salmon populations. The Tribe leads a diverse plaintiff group united by a common interest in restoring healthy relationships between people, fire, forests and fish.

NCAP Statement on Bt Applications

By Megan Dunn from Blog - Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides. Published on Apr 22, 2016.

The mission of the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP) is to protect the health of people and the environment by advancing alternatives to pesticides.

With our mission and values in mind, we have considered the health and environmental effects of the proposed use of Bacillus thuringiensis v. kurstaki (Btk). We consider Btk, a biological control, to be the most reasonable alternative to using toxic synthetic chemicals for eradicating gypsy moths at this time.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Announces Inexplicable Decision to Reverse Course on Protecting Rare Forest Mammal

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Apr 14, 2016.

Agency abruptly withdraws proposed rule that would have protected the Pacific fisher under the Endangered Species Act.

Tips for Safe Paddling on the Tualatin River

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Apr 14, 2016.

On April 12, 2016 a kayaker was rescued from the Tualatin River 1/2 mile downstream of Cook Park by TVFR and Clackamas rescue teams.  Those familiar with this stretch of the river know that this shallow location always has current.  At springtime flow levels, the kayaker was unable to paddle upstream.  She was wearing a […]

Solar Oregon Presents the 2016 Solar Winery Tour

By Lisa Holmes from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Apr 13, 2016.

On Saturday, May 21st, Solar Oregon will present the 2016 Solar Winery Tour, hosted by local solar-powered wineries. Transportation will be provided, with pick-up locations in the Portland, Tualatin, Salem, and the Eugene area.

High Desert Speaker Series Wraps with New Look at Old Favorite: the John Day

By paul@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Apr 11, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association's High Desert Speaker Series concludes in Portland on April 25th at 7 p.m. with the talk, Hidden Wonders of the John Day, by ONDA Stewardship Director Ben Gordon.

High Desert Speaker Series finale in Bend

By paul@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Apr 11, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association's High Desert Speaker Series finale in Bend takes place on April 26 at 7 p.m. with a special presentation from ONDA Central Oregon Wilderness Coordinator Gena Goodman-Campbell.

Thank You River Connections Sponsors

By trkpost from Tualatin Riverkeepers. Published on Apr 05, 2016.

Thank You Premier Community Bank, Metro, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Backyard Bird Shops, and NW Natural.

Upholding the Legacy

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Mar 23, 2016.

I grew up in New England with a forest outside my back door, but my grandparents grew up in the high desert above San  more...

Feds reject Jordan Cove LNG terminal

By morgan from KS In The Press. Published on Mar 11, 2016.

Federal regulators have rejected plans for a liquefied natural gas terminal in Coos Bay. On Friday, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied applications from two Delaware companies to site the massive Jordan Cove Energy Project in the Southern Oregon coastal town.

The View from My Desk

By Megan Selvig from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Feb 18, 2016.

I have an office job…in the middle of the woods. I am a year-round resident of Jawbone Flats. It is winter, which means no  more...

High Desert Speaker Series continues in Bend

By elisa@onda.org from Press Releases. Published on Feb 12, 2016.

The Oregon Natural Desert Association’s High Desert Speaker Series continues in Bend on March 15 at 7 p.m. when Chuck Gates, founding board member of the East Cascades Bird Conservancy, will present details of the lives and behaviors of the many fascinating birds that call Oregon’s high desert home.

Thankful for the end of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge takeover

By Lindsay Jones from Press Releases. Published on Feb 11, 2016.

As the media trucks pull out and the wheels of justice move forward, the Oregon Natural Desert Association vows to remain committed to the health and welfare of the Malheur Refuge.

KS Wild Joins Statewide Actions to Support Public Lands

By Amy from KS In The Press. Published on Jan 21, 2016.

"We're going to be positive. We're going to be peaceful and we're going to talk about how much we love public lands."

Meet Our New Program Director, Jay!

By Gabrielle from Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center. Published on Jan 08, 2016.

Jay Davis just moved to Oregon from Wisconsin, with a background in running experiential education programs in both Minnesota and California. With a Master’s  more...

Press Release: McKenzie Camp acquisition

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 30, 2015.

The McKenzie River Trust protects clean water and salmon habitat near Blue River following a land acquisition from Rosboro. Continue reading

It’s the trees

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Dec 21, 2015.

Thanks to you, an oak woodland and working forest is protected. Continue reading

Congress Passes Bill Extending Federal Tax Credits for Solar

By Lisa Holmes from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Dec 18, 2015.

Hours before Congress adjured for holidays, they passed legislation that extended the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) for solar.

Disaster-Resilient Solar PV

By Lisa Holmes from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Dec 12, 2015.

What are you going to do in the event of a major disaster? Are you prepared? Besides the basic needs of food, water, and shelter, energy will be a key factor in your recovery efforts.

‘Safe Harbors’ for native fish

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Nov 17, 2015.

This is part of a series about the MRT members who have played a part in the incredible comeback of Oregon chub. In the coming days and weeks, we’ll share more stories of MRT members who aided the recovery. ‘Safe … Continue reading

The importance of healthy floodplains

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Nov 11, 2015.

Because of members like Art and Anita Johnson, we've helped Oregon chub recover. Continue reading

Beers Made By Walking comes to Eugene

By liz from McKenzie River Trust. Published on Oct 30, 2015.

8 local breweries have created beers inspired by hikes on MRT lands, and you can taste the results. Today Continue reading

Happy Valley Launches HV Solar Program

By vast from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Oct 01, 2015.

The City of Happy Valley, OR, a fast-growing suburb of Portland, was recently awarded a grant from Northwest Solar Communities to increase solar photovoltaic installations among homeowners.

Solar Now! University Sizzles

By vast from News – Solar Oregon. Published on Sep 22, 2015.

It’s been a few short weeks, since this year’s Solar Now! University and I want to thank the many partners, staff members, and sponsors who helped make this event a success.

OLCV Hosts 2015 Photo Contest!

By April Christenson from . Published on Aug 14, 2015.

We are excited to announce that OLCV is hosting its 2015 photo contest! As we ramp up to launch our Legislative Scorecard, we wanted to see Oregon through the eyes ...

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OCN Announces the 2015 Priorities for a Healthy Oregon

By April Christenson from . Published on Aug 14, 2015.

Today, the Oregon Conservation Network – a coalition of environmental advocates from across Oregon coordinated by the Oregon League of Conservation Voters –together announced their 2015 Priorities for a Healthy ...

The post OCN Announces the 2015 Priorities for a Healthy Oregon appeared first on .

Clean Fuels Program Drives On

By April Christenson from . Published on Aug 14, 2015.

PORTLAND, OR- The bill to lift the sunset on the Clean Fuels Program, SB 324, was approved by the Oregon Senate today by a vote of 17-13. The program is key ...

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200 Volunteers Join Together in Salem for the OCN/OLCV Lobby Day

By April Christenson from . Published on Aug 13, 2015.

Salem, OR – Volunteers and environmental leaders from across the state arrived in Salem today for the OCN/OLCV lobby day – the Clean, Green Lobby Machine. From southern Oregon to ...

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Clean Fuels Statement from OLCV, Oregon Environmental Council, & Climate Solutions

By April Christenson from . Published on Jun 20, 2015.

Portland, OR – Today, Oregon’s Governor confirmed what had become clear to many over the last week: Oregonians don’t have to choose between good roads and clean air. Representatives of ...

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Statement from OLCV Executive Director on Passage of Clean Fuels Extension by Oregon House of Representatives

By April Christenson from . Published on Mar 04, 2015.

Portland, OR – After more than five hours of debate, the Oregon House of Representatives passed SB 324, legislation that lifts the 2015 sunset on Oregon’s Clean Fuels Program, which ...

The post Statement from OLCV Executive Director on Passage of Clean Fuels Extension by Oregon House of Representatives appeared first on .

A Message from OLCV on the Resignation of Governor Kitzhaber & Transition to Governor Brown

By April Christenson from . Published on Feb 16, 2015.

Oregon League of Conservation Voters thanks Governor John Kitzhaber for his service and his commitment to protecting Oregon’s environment, especially his leadership on the critical issue of climate change. We ...

The post A Message from OLCV on the Resignation of Governor Kitzhaber & Transition to Governor Brown appeared first on .

testing

By rocco from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on May 28, 2014.

testing sahring

By renewables from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on May 24, 2014.

Firm cuts back request for McKenzie water

By jmac from WaterWatch of Oregon. Published on Aug 10, 2012.

  The Veneta company says it wants to take 10.4 million instead of 21 million gallons a day from the river BY CHRISTIAN WIHTOL The Register-Guard Friday, Jun 15, 2012 A Veneta company has cut in half its request for … Continue reading

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 31, 2010.

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 30, 2010.

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 29, 2010.

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 29, 2010.

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By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Jul 28, 2010.

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Temporary Rules Filed On Business Energy Tax Credit Program

By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Nov 03, 2009.

Nine Federal Agencies Enter into a Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Transmission Siting on Federal Lands

By David Wolf from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Oct 29, 2009.

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Energy issues are important to daily life

By renewables from Renewable Northwest - Making the Northwest's Clean Energy Potential a Reality.. Published on Oct 16, 2009.

Publication Date: 
July 20, 2010
As important as energy is to our economy and quality of life, it isn't surprising that energy issues are in the news on a daily basis these days. Dependence on foreign energy suppliers and on fossil fuels - which contribute to climate change - is not a strategy that is sustainable for our needs. Ultimately, a clean, secure, homegrown energy future will be needed to revitalize our economy and sustain us for the long-term.
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